signature valmetValmet will deliver equipment and services for a rebuild of the soft wood pulp line at Holmen's Iggesund mill in Sweden. The rebuild will improve production stability, cut variable costs and increase pulp production capacity by 15 percent equally to 50,000 tonnes. The works will be implemented in two stages during 2015 and 2016.

The order is included in Valmet's first quarter 2015 orders received.The value of the order will not be disclosed.

"We have a good experience since we have had Valmet presses in our mill for many years. This rebuild will eliminate bottle necks in the process and increase pulp capacity. We will also cut variable costs which will strengthen our competitiveness", says Olov Winblad von Walter, Mill Director, Iggesund.

"This rebuild is the first step towards a press based bleach plant. The high outlet consistency makes the process easier to control and the volume of effluent will be less than for washers with lower discharge consistencies. Also water and chemical consumption will be minimized. We are looking forward to a good co-operation in this project", says Mikael Gustafsson, Sales Manager, Valmet.

Technical information about Valmet's delivery

The scope of the Valmet delivery includes main machinery, basic engineering and erection. In the first stage, two pressure diffusers will be rebuilt, one in the cooking plant and one in the brown stock washing, where also a new TwinRoll press, will be installed. In the second stage, the oxygen delignification stage will be extended into a two-stage OxyTrac system, which will make it possible to still reach lower kappa numbers in case of a further production increase. In the bleach plant two new TwinRoll presses will be installed.

About Holmen and Iggesund mill

Holmen is a forest industry group that manufactures printing paper, paperboard and sawn timber and runs forestry and energy production operations.

Holmen's Iggesund mill is one of the most advanced, fully integrated pulp and paperboard mills in the world. The product family is called Invercote and is used for the highest quality graphics products and packaging. Exclusive packaging for perfume, chocolate, wine, spirits, cigarettes and CD covers are examples of applications. The mill has a production capacity of 340,000 tonnes per year and has 800 employees.

For further information, please contact:

Mikael Gustafsson, Sales Manager, Pulp and Energy Business Line, Valmet, Tel. +46 70 653 3809

Valmet Corporation is a leading global developer and supplier of services and technologies for the pulp, paper and energy industries. Our 10,500 professionals around the world work close to our customers and are committed to moving our customers' performance forward - every day.
 
Valmet's services cover everything from maintenance outsourcing to mill and plant improvements and spare parts. Our strong technology offering includes entire pulp mills, tissue, board and paper production lines, as well as power plants for bio-energy production.
 
Valmet's net sales in 2014 were approximately EUR 2.5 billion. Valmet's objective is to become the global champion in serving its customers.
 
Valmet's head office is in Espoo, Finland and its shares are listed on the NASDAQ OMX Helsinki Ltd.
 
Read more www.valmet.com  , www.twitter.com/valmetglobal

Published in European News

2015 02 03 090151

Iggesund Paperboard is working via the American crowdsourcing company Crowdspring to challenge the world’s designers to improve existing consumer packaging.

“Every day we all see examples of packaging that could be improved by a better choice of materials or a better design,” explains Staffan Sjöberg, who is in charge of the project at Iggesund Paperboard. “Now we’re giving designers all over the world the chance to contribute their ideas on how to replace packaging made of glass, plastic or metal with solutions that use paperboard.”

2015 02 03 090335

Iggesund is challenging designers to make everyday consumer packaging more sustainable by replacing plastic, glass and metal with paperboard. As one example, a decade ago almost all sandwich packaging was made of plastic – now paperboard packaging is increasingly common for sustainability reasons.

He stresses that Iggesund is not looking for inexpensive ideas which can be put into commercial use. Instead, the aim is to get a picture of how global designers as a collective group believe they can steer packaging development in a more sustainable direction.

“We will not claim any commercial rights to the ideas that come in,” Sjöberg says. “We’re just interested in getting a snapshot of how designers believe they can improve the packaging they see in the shops they visit on a daily basis. We want to publish the ideas and maybe reproduce some of them in physical form but we are not interested in exploiting them commercially.”

For Crowdspring the collaboration with Iggesund Paperboard is an unusual project. Normally the online marketplace’s services are used when someone wants either a number of inexpensive design proposals or a wide range of ideas.

“This is an unusual reason for initiating a project with us,” comments Mike Samson, who is coordinating the project with Iggesund. “But we believe its combination of sustainability and innovative thinking will attract many of the thousands of designers listed in our database.”

Iggesund Paperboard is part of the Swedish forest industry group Holmen, one of the world’s 100 most sustainable industrial companies according to the UN Global Compact Index. Iggesund’s annual turnover is close to SEK 5bn (EUR 525m) and its flagship product Invercote is sold in over 100 countries.

The company has two product families, Invercote and Incada, which are both among the quality leaders in their segment. Since 2010 Iggesund has invested SEK 3.3bn (EUR 346m) to increase the energy efficiency and reduce the fossil carbon emissions from its paperboard mills. The investments have made both mills almost self-sufficient in electricity.

Iggesund and the Holmen Group report their fossil carbon emissions to the international Carbon Disclosure Project and are on the project’s A List, which singles out almost 200 companies world wide for their work against climate change. The two companies’ environmental data are integrated into their annual reports, which are produced in accordance with the Global Reporting Initiative’s highest level of sustainability accounting.

Published in European News

Iggesund Paperboard’s 2014 Christmas card takes its recipients on a journey from a forest setting to the city of Stockholm profiled against a sky gleaming with the northern lights. Iggesund has a tradition of using its Christmas card as an ambassador for paperboard as a material and to display various printing techniques. This year’s edition was designed by Papersmyths of Bristol, England, who also managed the production as a whole.

iggecard

Iggesund continues its tradition of sophisticated Christmas cards featuring an exciting design. This year’s card combines a forest theme with typical Stockholm buildings silhouetted against a shimmering Scandinavian winter’s night, and was designed by Papersmyths in Bristol, England.

The card is in the form of an altarpiece whose laser-cut doors form the outline of a forest. They open to reveal a city skyline in several layers, whose relationship to each other depends on how wide the doors are opened.

“In their turn, the building facades are profiled against a night sky with northern lights,” explained Iain Smyth of Papersmyths. “The shimmering effect is created with a clear holographic twinkling foil, with the moon and stars reversed out. The forest and city silhouettes are finely laser cut and decorated with spot UV ink stars, with Christmas greetings in silver foil blocking to create a really exciting scene.

“I wanted to convey the feeling of both the forest, which is the starting point for Iggesund’s products, and the Scandinavian winter night.”

The card consists of five parts, which were assembled into one unit. The complex assembly was done with the help of a team of undergraduate students in Bristol but the task placed high demands on the participants.

“They needed a combination of deft fingers and good humour to succeed,” Smyth added.

To give the card even more of a Christmas touch, a special envelope was created to underline the idea that this is almost a Christmas present. The envelope has an elegant closure which makes the most of Iggesund paperboard's tensile strength.

The card was printed by Taylor Brothers in Bristol and the laser cutting done by Lasercraft of Huntington, England.

Published in European News

The board of the Holmen Group, which includes Iggesund Paperboard, decided on Wednesday to give the green light for investments totalling EUR 60 million in Iggesund’s mills at Iggesund, Sweden and Workington, England.

workington mill

At Iggesund the investments will eliminate bottlenecks in pulp production so it can be increased from the current 370,000 tonnes to 420,000 tonnes. The target for the board mill is to increase the capacity by 10 per cent without investments.

“After we brought the new recovery boiler on line and developed our purification systems for both air and water, the mill now has unused potential, in both the pulp and board mill, which we can activate,” comments Olov Winblad von Walter, Director of Iggesund Mill. “This is exciting because we are taking yet another step towards being one of the world’s leaders in mill technology with the lowest environmental impact. This move also further reinforces our competitiveness in the form of lower variable costs.”

igge sundThe investment in Workington will increase the mill’s paperboard production capacity from the current 200,000 tonnes to 220,000 tonnes. This investment will also make the mill a leader in folding box board technology thanks to a rebuild of the paperboard machine’s press section which will increase product quality. The rebuild will be completed by June 2016.

“We are experiencing strong demand for our improved Incada, not least because European converters regard it as the paperboard with the best runnability for applications involving mass-market consumer products,” comments Ulf Löfgren, Managing Director of Iggesund’s mill at Workington. “In that situation of course it is positive that we can increase our capacity so more people can benefit from Incada’s advantages.”

“We see no difficulty in increasing Incada’s presence in Europe,” adds Arvid Sundblad, Vice President Sales and Marketing at Iggesund. “Our market share has been limited by our capacity. The planned capacity increase combined with Incada’s recognised quality and our service gives us a excellent position.”

Over a five-year period Iggesund Paperboard has invested strongly in strengthening its competitiveness via lower energy costs, whilst simultaneously minimising its use of fossil fuels. A total of EUR 361 million has been used for this purpose in both Workington and Iggesund. The investments announced now are more focused on increasing production.

“We have reduced our environmental impact and also taken control of our energy costs,” Sundblad concludes. “We are well equipped to face tougher competition in the paperboard market but above all with regard to other types of packaging material. Our strategy is organic growth and for Workington, this is the first step in that direction. The announced investments will give us an excellent market position in terms of both product quality and capacity.”

Published in European News

Iggesund has embarked on a substantial initiative to reduce its environmental impact, which is now being recognized the world over. In October, the Pulp & Paper Industry (PPI) presented Iggesund with its “Bio Strategy of the Year” award based on an extensive investment program to reduce fossil carbon emissions.

workington mill

“For several decades Iggesund has been systematically working to free itself from dependence on fossil fuel; switching the source of energy required to power our mills to bioenergy and, at the same time, increasing our energy efficiency,” says Arvid Sundblad, Vice President of Sales and Marketing for Iggesund. “We are satisfied with what we have achieved and pleased at the signs of recognition from the outside world.”

Strategic investment in a turbine-equipped recovery boiler have made the mill in Iggesund, Sweden fossil-fuel free to roughly 95% and nearly self-sufficient with respect to electricity; and in a biomass boiler at its mill in Workington, England, completely fossil-fuel free and a net supplier of green energy to the national electricity grid. The annual reduction in fossil carbon emissions from both mills is equivalent to taking more than 85,000 cars off the road.

arvid iggeBut the story hardly ends there. Also in October, the Holmen Group, which includes Iggesund Paperboard, was elevated to the “A List” of the CDP Climate Performance Leadership Index 2014. The CDP (Carbon Disclosure Project) is an international not-for-profit organization that has the world’s only global system for measuring, reporting on, handling and sharing important environmental information.

Placement on the A List means that the Holmen Group is now one of 187 globally active companies that are regarded as being the most advanced for the actions they have taken to reduce carbon dioxide emissions and to manage the business risks associated with climate change.

“Our high placement in this evaluation proves that active energy and climate efforts plus clear communication about them reinforce both our brand and our credibility in the sustainability area,” says Lars Strömberg, Director of Sustainable and Environmental Affairs at Holmen.

Just over a year ago, the Holmen Group was added to the United Nations Global Compact Index, which lists the world’s 100 most sustainable companies. This year’s evaluation results have just been announced and Holmen remains on that list.

“In this context it is important to note that we are a heavy process industry competing with companies like banks and insurance companies, whose biggest environmental problem is the ozone emissions from their office laser printer. Yet our environmental work can easily hold its own against them,” Sundblad emphasises. He adds that this recognition of the group’s environmental efforts is part of everything that Iggesund supplies to its customers.

“Our service has many aspects, ranging from delivery service to knowledge transfer – and we include them all under the concept of Care by Iggesund. This includes having an environmental programme that reinforces our customers’ businesses.”

Care by Iggesund includes everything from customised delivery solutions to knowledge transfer, a sample service, technical support in local markets and transparent sustainability work.

Published in European News
Thursday, 27 November 2014 08:18

22 000 unique covers of Inspire

When Iggesund Paperboard planned the first digitally printed cover for its inspirational magazine Inspire, the ambition level was high. The whole issue was devoted to the possibilities of digital print, and one of the goals was to produce 22,000 unique covers in a way never done before.

2014-11-27 082021

Each and every one of the 22,000 covers of Iggesund Paperboard’s inspirational magazine Inspire is unique, with variable printing of colour fields, varnish patterns and time codes.

Just adding a recipient’s name or a serial number was a bit too easy. More interesting was to start from Inspire’s tradition of using graphics on its cover. The Inspire editorial team created a 16-minute-long film where each frame was then used as a cover.

“It might seem like a roundabout procedure but it was far simpler than creating 22,000 individual print files using layout software,” Thomas Idebäck, Motion Graphic Designer, says.

The variation in the printed covers lies partly in the colour fields but also in the spot varnish. The colour field variations by themselves make each cover unique but the varnish patterns also vary. Each cover is also marked with the time code of the particular film frame on which it is based.

Digaloo digital printers in Stockholm were sent the 1.4 TB of raw data that had to be processed into pages. As the work progressed, the amount of data being processed grew to between 3.5 and 4 TB. Fortunately the printers had invested in a new press and a RIP (Raster Image Processor) IN-100 to increase their processing capacity.

“This print run is totally unique. I’ve talked with colleagues in my international network of digital printers and no one has heard of anything similar,” says Jannes Dahlgren, CEO of Digaloo. The company took 27 hours of active printing time to complete the project.

Published in European News
Monday, 10 November 2014 21:15

From Carnaby Street to global recognition

It all began with a small design studio on a little road off Carnaby Street. SANTORO was Lucio and Meera Santoro’s small-scale venture into innovative graphic design. Today their work is found around the world and they have won some 50 international awards for their designs, greeting cards and 3D books.

The company’s first big success came with its Swing Cards, a series of movable 3D greeting cards which are sent flat but which unfold themselves immediately they are removed from the envelope. Over the years the collection has gradually expanded and now consists of more than 90 different cards, which are sold world-wide, with over 15 million recipients to date.

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“If I’d realised how much work is involved in every card I never would have started this,” commented Lucio Santoro in the company’s showroom at the current headquarters at Rotunda Point in Wimbledon. “This must be the highest level of construction using paper materials.”

“But at the same time, the demanding construction work has also protected us from copies and plagiarists. There are many other products which are far easier to copy.”

It was while working on the original Swing Cards collection during the first half of the 1990s that the studio first encountered the paperboard called Invercote made by Iggesund Paperboard. Since then all the studio’s advanced collections have been made using Invercote.

“Invercote maintains a very high and consistent quality,” Lucio Santoro said. “For our purposes, though, a few of its unusual features are the most important. Its very high tear resistance enables us to create finer details while at the same time the construction is more durable.

“Another important property is dimensional stability. Few people realise that when you are working in three dimensions you not only have to ensure perfect registration between the printing inks but also with the printed image on the reverse. Dimensional stability is crucial for this.”

Over time SANTORO has built up a portfolio of designs, which the studio now licenses to other users, an activity that currently brings in almost half the company’s revenues. Designs by Santoro are now printed on everything from bags and gift articles to housewares, notebooks, ceramics, apparel and footwear to name just a few. Lucio and Meera have also produced three 3D non-fiction books: Journey to the Moon, Wild Oceans and Predators.

Sophisticated greeting cards are still an important part of SANTORO’s business. Last year the company launched its Pirouettes collection, which has good prospects of emulating the popularity of the Swing Cards.

“We believe strongly in Pirouettes – you have to when it takes about two years to develop a collection,” Lucio said. “Sales have gone well so far but it will be a few years before we can see how the collection measures up to Swing Cards’ twenty years of popularity.”

About 30 people work at SANTORO’s design studio in London, with a further 60 employees around the world.

Caption: “Invercote’s tear resistance and dimensional stability are incredibly important to us as a company making sophisticated moveable constructions from paper material,” said Lucio Santoro, who together with Meera Santoro founded SANTORO in 1985. © Iggesund

Iggesund

Iggesund Paperboard is part of the Swedish forest industry group Holmen, one of the world’s 100 most sustainable companies listed on the United Nations Global Compact Index. Iggesund’s turnover is just over €500 million and its flagship product Invercote is sold in more than 100 countries. The company has two brand families, Invercote and Incada, both positioned at the high end of their respective segments. Since 2010 Iggesund has invested more than €380 million to increase its energy efficiency and reduce the fossil emissions from its production.

Iggesund and the Holmen Group report all their fossil carbon emissions to the Carbon Disclosure Project. The environmental data form an integral part of an annual report that complies with the Global Reporting Initiative’s highest level of sustainability reporting. Iggesund was founded as an iron mill in 1685, but has been making paperboard for more than 50 years. The two mills, in northern Sweden and northern England employ 1500 people.

Further information:

Staffan Sjöberg
Public Relations Manager
staffan.sjoberg@iggesund.com

Iggesund Paperboard
SE-825 80 Sweden
Tel: +4665028256
Mobile: +46703064800
www.iggesund.com

Published in European News

igge sund“We’re getting close to the vision of a fossil-free mill that we’ve lived with and that has driven our investments for a long time,” says Mill Director Olov Winblad von Walter. “Our new recovery boiler, which came on line in spring 2012, is getting better and better as we fine tune it, and our increasing pulp production is also boosting our energy production.”

For a while in mid-April Iggesund Paperboard’s Swedish paperboard mill, Iggesund Mill, was able to operate solely on bioenergy and also supply almost all its own electricity needs. Another important aspect in the vision for Iggesund Mill is that emissions to air and water should be so low that Iggesund is among the global leaders among comparable manufacturers. Yet another goal is that a minimum of by-products will go to landfill.

Iggesund Mill is one of the world’s integrated paperboard mills with the highest level of investment. When it started up the new recovery boiler was the mill’s biggest investment to date, at a cost of about EUR 250 million. The boiler enabled the mill to gradually increase its annual pulp production from what was then 350,000 tonnes to 420,000.

“Our sulphate process for pulp production means that we separate out the cellulose fibres that comprise half the mass of a log,” Winblad von Walter continues. “The other half consists of the wood’s binding agent, which is mostly an energy-rich substance called lignin. We burn this in the recovery boiler and it produces enough steam and electricity to cover more than 90 per cent of our energy needs.”

A fossil-free energy supply is not the only benefit from Iggesund’s new recovery boiler. After the boiler had been fine tuned, it turned out that particle emissions from the mill, which were already low, had been halved. Sulphur emissions, which contribute to the acidification of surrounding land, have also fallen by more than 80 per cent from what were already low levels. 

Just over a year ago Iggesund’s board mill in Workington, England, radically changed its own energy source. From having run on fossil natural gas, the mill switched to using biomass. Achieving this required the investment of about EUR 122 million in a new biofuel boiler. Today the mill operates solely on biofuel and in addition to covering its own energy needs it also supplies fossil-free electricity to the UK electricity grid.

“One of the goals driving our investments is long-term sustainability, and the investments in both Iggesund and Workington are the result of that approach,” explains Staffan Jonsson, head of Group Technology at the Holmen Group, to which Iggesund belongs.

The Holmen Group is one of the world’s 100 most sustainable companies according to the UN sustainability index, the Global Compact Index.

Caption 1: Iggesund Mill’s new recovery boiler – which was completed in 2012 at a cost of about EUR 250 million – is one of the basic requirements for being able to operate the mill without using any fossil fuel.© Iggesund

Additional Info

  • About

    Iggesund

    Iggesund Paperboard is part of the Swedish forest industry group Holmen, one of the world’s 100 most sustainable companies listed on the United Nations Global Compact Index. Iggesund’s turnover is just over €500 million and its flagship product Invercote is sold in more than 100 countries. The company has two brand families, Invercote and Incada, both positioned at the high end of their respective segments. Since 2010 Iggesund has invested more than €380 million to increase its energy efficiency and reduce the fossil emissions from its production. 

    Iggesund and the Holmen Group report all their fossil carbon emissions to the Carbon Disclosure Project. The environmental data form an integral part of an annual report that complies with the Global Reporting Initiative’s highest level of sustainability reporting. Iggesund was founded as an iron mill in 1658, but has been making paperboard for more than 50 years. The two mills, in northern Sweden and northern England employ 1500 people.

  • Contacts

    Further information:

    Staffan Sjöberg
    Public Relations Manager
    staffan.sjoberg@iggesund.com 

    Iggesund Paperboard
    SE-825 80 Sweden
    Tel: +4665028256
    Mobile: +46703064800
    www.iggesund.com 

Published in European News

The paperboard manufacturer Iggesund Paperboard, part of the Holmen forest products group, is undergoing changes on several levels. Last autumn the company gained a new CEO, Annica Bresky.

A university graduate in engineering, Bresky has roots in both Greece and the rural heart of Sweden’s Småland province. She was previously CEO of BillerudKorsnäs Karlsborg AB and before that she worked as production manager for Stora Enso Kvarnsveden’s most modern paper machine. When she took over the reins at Iggesund in October, the top positions of both of the company’s board mills were vacant, as was the position of company financial director. She has therefore had unique opportunities to shape a new management team that reflects the dynamism she wants to see within the organisation.

ins igge“The market has changed and this process will continue,” she explains. “By working in an intelligent and more dynamic way we will be able to match our customers’ demands even better than before.”

During the autumn Iggesund Mill gained a new manager, Olov Winblad von Walter, who comes from the top job at Metsä Board’s paper mill in Husum, Sweden. The new manager of Iggesund’s Workington Mill is the former financial director there, Ulf Löfgren. The new financial director is Tobias Bäärnman, who comes most recently from the consultancy Connecta but who has experience in fast-moving consumer goods with Mediamarkt, Procter & Gamble and Statoil. The management team has been further reinforced with Eva Thorén, the HR manager, and Anna-Lena Ström, the supply chain director.

In addition to these changes, Iggesund will be tearing down walls within its sales organisation. Previously the company had separate teams for Europe and the rest of the world but now the global marketing and sales responsibility will be combined under the leadership of Arvid Sundblad.

“For more than a decade we have seen the conversion of packaging for consumer goods move from western Europe to other parts of the world, mostly in the east,” Annica Bresky says. “Brand owners with headquarters in one part of the world can have the manufacturing of both their goods and packaging in another. This is globalisation in a nutshell and we must adapt to it.

“Fifteen years ago Iggesund was the first Scandinavian forest products company to adapt its European organisation to the new conditions arising from the European Union. Now we simply need to take another step to ensure that we can live up to – and surpass – the service level required by our customers.”

One of the prerequisites for further developing Iggesund’s service level is the introduction of a new business system – the backbone of all production and supply processes. Changing systems is a big step and countless tests have been done to ensure that the transition will be painless for customers.

“Our customers’ development and needs are the starting point for our own continual process of change,” concludes Iggesund’s new CEO. “Doing business with us will become even easier. Iggesund has long been a fantastic company and we definitely have the strength needed to continue to be competitive in the future too.”

Additional Info

  • About

    About Iggesund:

    Iggesund Paperboard is part of the Swedish forest industry group Holmen, one of the world’s 100 most sustainable companies listed on the United Nations Global Compact Index. Iggesund’s turnover is just over €500 million and its flagship product Invercote is sold in more than 100 countries. The company has two brand families, Invercote and Incada, both positioned at the high end of their respective segments. Since 2010 Iggesund has invested more than €380 million to increase its energy efficiency and reduce the fossil emissions from its production.

    Iggesund and the Holmen Group report all their fossil carbon emissions to the Carbon Disclosure Project. The environmental data form an integral part of an annual report that complies with the Global Reporting Initiative’s highest level of sustainability reporting. Iggesund was founded as an iron mill in 1658, but has been making paperboard for more than 50 years. The two mills, in northern Sweden and northern England employ 1500 people.

  • Contacts

    Further information:Staffan Sjöberg
    Public Relations Manager
    staffan.sjoberg@iggesund.com

    Iggesund Paperboard
    SE-825 80 Sweden
    Tel: +4665028256
    Mobile: +46703064800
    www.iggesund.com

Published in European News
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