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Just a few short months ago at the start of the COVID-19 pandemic in the United States, news reports were filled with scenes of pandemonium at supermarkets and shelves emptied of cleaning supplies and — most critically — bathroom tissue. Tales of selfish tissue hoarders and desperate tissue searchers for that formerly bountiful commodity were daily media fodder.

The pandemic crisis placed enormous pressure on the tissue supply chain. But the sector proved to be remarkably resilient, and the pandemic has actually accelerated the pace of change within the industry. To assess the lasting impact of COVID-19 on the tissue business, Tissue World magazine hosted an online panel discussion June 23 with four industry experts.

2020 07 22 100803Moderated by Jonathan Roberts, conference chair and content advisor for Tissue World, the panel included Kim Underhill, group president of Kimberly-Clark North America; Brian Allen director of cyber advisory services for EY, USA; Udaiyan Jatar, founder of Blue Earth Network, USA; and Ivo Kool, senior product development manager, tissue, paper, nonwovens for Sam’s Club, USA.

The discussion has been edited for length and clarity.

Roberts began the session by noting the panelists all came from North American companies. “That’s not a coincidence,” he noted, “As this event was born out of Tissue World Miami, which was postponed from March and is due to take place in November of this year.”

Roberts then posed his first broad question: “How is the tissue business responding in this extraordinary time?”

Kimberly-Clark’s Underhill noted three areas that have been challenging and required significant leadership: “One being, first and foremost, the safety and well-being of our people and keeping our mills running. We quickly moved into implementing safety protocols — masks, social distancing, temperature checks and the like. A lot of factories had to shut down, but our goal was to keep it running.

“The second challenge was the unprecedented demand,” said Underhill. “There are lots of theories about this hoarding of bathroom tissue, and why bath tissue and towels versus other categories. The clearest explanation was that people felt like they needed a little sense of control. All of a sudden something we take for granted in North America became something you could not imagine life without.

“The demand escalated very fast and the challenge became we were just out of stock, and it wasn’t just Kimberly-Clark, the industry was challenged because of the increase in demand, and we still see that, particularly in the U.S.

“The last challenge was how can we work with our retail partners to fix the supply chain. We realized there were parts of the supply chain we had to rework because it had never seen such extreme and quick consumer demand, which opened up a lot of challenges but also a lot of opportunities in thinking about our supply chain going forward.”

“From the beginning of March to the end of April I’d say purchases almost doubled and then slowly went down to about half,” said Kool of Sam’s Club. “It was quite amazing. A couple of trucks would arrive, we’d unload them, and the product would be gone within an hour or two because people would get on the phone and say, ‘Hey, it’s in town!’ And off everyone would go and buy it.

“But I really have to say for our private brand business, our vendors supported us unbelievably well,” Kool continued. “I mean, everyone pulled out all stops.”

Roberts asked Jatar of Blue Earth Network how industries beyond tissue responded to the pandemic.

“The big companies did a really good job, the best processes I’ve seen,” said Jatar. “They’ve done a really good job about keeping communication going, building public trust and managing personal health and business health. Trust-building and empathy are pretty important.

“The second thing is while I know we are talking about COVID, we have to consider what happened with the Black Lives Matter movement that highlighted the big gaps between the haves and the have nots,” he said. “Companies are recognizing that words are not enough, and there’s a greater tendency to take action now more than ever before.”

“The best organizations are really taking action, supporting their employees, whether it’s with childcare, flexibility in hours or developing diverse talent,” Jatar noted. “And there are opportunities for companies to say we want to be the most diverse and have the best talent and extending their support to Black people.

“And lastly, there’s a push to develop innovation — especially among smaller companies,” he said. “They are innovating product and the supply chain. They are looking through the lens of the future, when people are going to expect more transparency in the supply chain, more justice in the supply chain, when they are going to expect new technologies that address health and sanitation. These companies are innovating from the ground up rather than just fixing legacy systems.”

Roberts asked Allen of EY what kinds of security issues companies and employees were facing during this new period of working remotely.

“We’ve definitely seen a ballooning of threats,” said Allen. “Which is fairly typical when criminals see a fresh opportunity. And it’s coming from organized crime and different state actors. We are all working in a different environment and the biggest weaknesses we’re seeing is employees not being aware of threats.

“One, we have to recognize we are working in a different environment,” Allen continued. “Two, the actors are very sophisticated. They are getting very good at their game. We’re seeing very complicated phishing scams that are exploiting different vulnerabilities — they are selling personal protective equipment, they are offering advice from WHO and doctors, they are exploiting e-commerce.

“Security firms are keeping executives better informed about these risks so they can find the right balance between risk and reward, and can better maneuver in this new environment,” he noted. “But that information about risks needs to be more timely and more in-depth.”

The discussion moved on to the positive lessons learned from the coronavirus crisis.

“There has been an awakening of an awareness of the systemic failures of our economy and our society that were inherent before the COVID crisis,” said Jatar. “A crisis tends to shine a spotlight on your weakest connection, and one of them has been short-termism in the management of culture and gender across all kinds of organizations. There’s been an awakening of appreciation for workers that we didn’t see before.

“And there’s a greater appreciation of the changes that come about by remote working, from improved communications to greater sustainability in work surroundings and a greater appreciation for our human ability to connect online and collaborate,” he said. “Organizations are taking advantage of social distancing and remote working to develop bigger and better ideas and better processes through online collaboration.”

“This crisis has been a gift that has given us an opportunity to accelerate some changes we have wanted to do for a very long time,” said Underhill. “Internally, in the tissue business, SKU management is very important, and one of the things we learned that will be a lasting impact is SKU simplification. In some of our businesses we have cut SKUs by over 70% and that has enabled us to get 15% to 20% improvement in capacity.

“Because the demand was so high, we had no choice but to make some difficult choices,” she said. “And we found that those choices weren’t so bad after all. I see that as sort of a mind-set shift going forward.

“I don’t think any of us would have said we could hold our business together while working from home for over three months,” said Underhill. “But we have. It’s changed the way we connect. I’ve heard people talking about how we’re more engaged, more accessible.”

Roberts asked what transformations we might see in the wake of COVID-19 in terms of consumer behavior, trends and business operations.

“I think we’ll see a more holistic approach,” said Allen. “Rather than looking at risk management as different silos, such as crisis management, information security or business security, we’re seeing a lot of alignment in risk practice to be more coordinated as we move through digitalization.

“One, there’s tremendous overlap in these practices,” he continued. “Two, there are great benefits in getting consistent and timely reporting. And three, we’re really starting to see that these risk assessments need to go deeper into the organization, and some of that is being driven by digitalization. And the demand and speed of digitalization is so significant that the risk practice, whether that’s cyber or IT risk, needs to be provided to business leaders throughout the organization so they can continuously make informed risk-based decisions.”

Roberts: “What changes in consumer behavior are likely to be most impactful and most enduring in the wake of the crisis?”

“We talk a lot about B2C, business-to-consumer, but I think now we are lot more C2B, consumer-to-business, with consumers telling us through their online behaviors and research what values matter to them,” said Jatar. “In this demonetized world, companies have to offer something more than product features and attributes to distinguish themselves. They need to come up with an X-factor that transcends their competitors.

“I’m seeing companies recognizing that consumers and society at large want a lot more out of business than just business,” he said. “They expect businesses to be a part of the community. Organizations that are taking the lead and engaging with Black Lives Matter are also businesses that are creating more equitable feelings for their employees and their customers. There are a couple of value areas where I’m seeing organizations really starting to build a relationship with the B2C and C2B interconnection to really differentiate themselves. But they need to translate those values into action. I think transparency is going to be the big trend going forward because in the digital world there is no place to hide. The companies that take the lead in transparency and build trust will get ahead of their competitors.”

Roberts: “What role does tissue play in a positive human future?”

“All of us are going to become more conscientious, aware and concerned about cleaning and germ control, whether that’s on your person, your automobile, your home or your office,” said Underhill. “I think this is a great opportunity for the tissue world to not only think about our products today, but where we can invent and create innovations that can actually protect at a greater level of confidence.

“I suspect that innovation is going to allow all of us to really gain confidence in protecting ourselves, our family and our environments more than ever before,” she said. “Companies that can invent in this space and create a point of differentiation with real tangible, clinical evidence that you can prevent germs, I think that’s going to be a significant opportunity for the tissue industry.”

Roberts then asked about attracting talent — is that going to be different and is it going to be a bigger challenge in the future?

“The positive thing is rethinking the way we work for the next generation,” said Underhill. “The next generation wants more flexibility, they want to work when they want and where they want, and I believe the former emphasis on visibility in the office, hours in the office — that’s completely reframed by this whole experience, and that’s not important anymore.

“We’re much more focused on the outcomes and how people are working,” she continued. “I’m very excited to see how we carry this forward, and I’m just going to say we’re not going back. We will definitely have much more flexible arrangements for our employee base, particularly our staff operations, in the future. We just have to figure out how to do it. We don’t have the answers yet, but we are definitely not going back to where we were on March 12.”

Tissue World 2020 is currently scheduled for Nov. 11-13, 2020, at the Miami Beach Convention Center.

Registration for North America’s largest gathering of the global tissue trade is still open and can be accessed at https://www.tissueworld.com/miami/en-us. Tissue World attendees typically include suppliers to the tissue industry, tissue converters, integrated tissue product makers, jumbo roll suppliers and retailers and distributors.

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North America’s largest tissue-related gathering will again be staged at the Miami Beach Convention Center

Originally scheduled in March, Tissue World Miami 2020 was postponed due to the COVID-19 virus outbreak and has been rescheduled for Nov. 11-13, 2020, at the Miami Beach Convention Center. All existing exhibitor and delegate bookings will move automatically to the new dates.

2020 03 06 152106Working in tandem with the MBCC, the show organizers secured a tenancy for both the Tissue World Miami conference and exhibition that are set to run concurrently. The Informa Markets team currently is discussing the revised dates with speakers and exhibitors with the expectation of securing their participation in November.

“We have been closely following developments since COVID–19 began spreading, and made the decision to postpone Tissue World Miami based on feedback from our customers,” said Agnes Gehot, deputy event director, Informa Markets. “By working closely with our venue partner Miami Beach Convention Center we were able to secure rescheduled dates for the conference and exhibition, which will now serve as an opportunity for our clients and exhibitors to gather in November.”

Holding the show later in the year “gives the market time to recover as demand catches up,” Gehot added.

“The rescheduled date provides clarity and ensures we have time and space to deliver the same fantastic event we promised, providing a safe and secure environment conducive to business, networking and professional education for the tissue production industry,” she said.

With the conference theme of “Ready for Reinvention, Ripe for Disruption: Will the 20s Roar for Tissue?” the conference and exhibition are expected to draw 200 exhibiting companies and more than 2,500 attendees from nearly 70 countries to South Florida.

Registration for North America’s largest gathering of the global tissue trade is still open and can be accessed at https://www.tissueworld.com/miami/en-us. Attendees typically include suppliers to the tissue industry, tissue converters, integrated tissue product makers, jumbo roll suppliers and retailers and distributors.

The Tissue World Miami conference brings fresh, critical and creative perspectives on America’s tissue business. Conference presenters will offer inspiration and interaction on these major themes:

Resilience

  • Supply-side volatility and risk with a focus on fiber supply.
  • Human risk factors such as attracting and retaining skills.
  • Reliance on supplier knowledge as opposed to in-house skill.
  • Cyber security and the vulnerabilities that increase with greater connectivity.

Operational Game Changers

  • Change drivers such as sustainability — including the need to ditch single-use plastics, its implications through the supply chain and the potential gains from upgrading.
  • Assessing the return on investment of upgrading America’s tissue-making assets.
  • Managing change – from evolving routes to market to technological adaptation imposed by such external factors as legislation and customer demand.

Buyer Expectations

  • Trends and forecasts.
  • The contrasting shopper propositions of in-store vs. online.
  • AfH – the rise of e-commerce and the challenge of cut-price entrants.

For more information about Tissue World Miami 2020, visit:

Registration: https://www.tissueworld.com/miami/en-us/register

Exhibitor List: https://exhibitors.informamarkets-info.com/tissue-world-miami-2020/

Conference Sessions: https://www.tissueworld.com/miami/en-us/conferencesessions

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2020 03 06 152106

Four-day conference complements the three-day exhibition showcasing the products and services of over 150 suppliers and manufacturers

In less than a week, Tissue World Miami 2020 will open with conference sessions from March 10-13 and an extensive trade show running March 11-13 at the Miami Beach Convention Center. Tissue World Miami is North America’s largest and exclusively dedicated tissue manufacturing gathering.

The event brings industry professionals from across the tissue supply chain together for four days of insightful conference sessions and a three-day tradeshow with over 150 fantastic exhibitors from across the globe.

Get your free visitor ticket to guarantee access to:

  • Free-to-attend tech talks (March 12) on the show floor, discussing the latest innovations and solutions to new and familiar challenges in our industry.
  • An opportunity to network at happy hour sessions on the show floor on March 11 and 12.
  • The Tissue World matchmaking app that provides a platform to organize those all-important meetings and facilitate catching up with familiar faces in the industry.
  • Source and evaluate new products and services from world-class exhibitors.

Industry Leaders Headline Conference Lineup

Conference keynote speaker is none other than Kimberly-Clark’s Group President Kim Underhill. Kimberly-Clark personal-care products are used by a quarter of the world’s population every day in 175 countries around the world.

Joining Kim Underhill for a casual yet wide-ranging “Fireside Chat" will be founder of Blue Earth Network, Udaiyan Jatar. Blue Earth Network trains, develops and supports leaders in discovering, inventing and scaling innovation and brands that transform business and society.

Pulp is the single most costly element of tissue, and Marina Negrisoli of Suzano Papel e Celulose anticipates the cycles to come that can make the difference between healthy profit and life-limiting losses. Headquartered in Brazil, Suzano is the largest pulp and paper company in Latin America, with presence in over 80 countries.

Walmart’s Sam’s Club — who wouldn’t want to know what that massive consumer tissue product developer has in mind? Ivo Kool, senior products development manager, is on the program to discuss the latest trends in consumer paper products from both the demand and supply sides.

Recruiting and retaining the talent to run 21st century tissue mills can be an all-consuming challenge. Heidi Brock, President and CEO of American Forest & Paper Association brings paper and other industry expertise to this vital subject.

And no Tissue World Miami conference would be complete without the man who knows the tissue universe better than any other: Esko Uutela, Principal, Tissue, at RISI. He’ll be looking at shifts in quality and trade barriers driving change in North America.

There is limited availability of conference tickets, so make sure to get yours soon to avoid disappointment.

For more information about Tissue World Miami 2020, visit:

Registration: https://registration.n200.com/survey/12ejeykp4edbp?actioncode=PRS2

Exhibitor List: https://exhibitors.informamarkets-info.com/tissue-world-miami-2020/

Conference Sessions: https://www.tissueworld.com/miami/en-us/conferencesessions

Conference Brochure: https://www.tissueworld.com/miami/en-us/Conference/Conference-Brochure

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At the dawn of a new decade of unpredictable challenges, yet even more opportunities, https://www.tissueworld.com/miami/en-us/">Tissue World Miami 2020 brings together thought leaders and influencers to explore creative approaches to the geopolitical, technical, legislative and behavioral forces at work in this dynamic global industry. Themed “Ready for Reinvention, Ripe for Disruption: Will the 20s Roar for Tissue?” the four-day conference and three-day exhibition is expected to draw 200 exhibiting companies and more than 2,500 attendees from nearly 70 countries to the Miami Beach Convention Center.

    2019 11 22 135635Registration for North America’s largest gathering of the global tissue trade is now open and can be accessed at this link: https://www.tissueworld.com/miami/en-us/register. Attendees typically include suppliers to the tissue industry, tissue converters, integrated tissue product makers, jumbo roll suppliers and retailers and distributors.

    “The fundamentals of the U.S. tissue business have changed significantly in recent decades, and the rate of change continues unabated,” said Agnes GeHot, Tissue World event director. “The country with the most advanced tissue machines and highest tissue consumption per capita is seeing the rise of private label, changes in consumer preferences and an intensifying trade war that is shaping the industry’s future. Tissue World Miami brings together an unparalleled lineup of experts who will deliver thought-provoking and actionable insights for tissue business leaders.”

    The Tissue World Miami conference brings fresh, critical and creative perspectives on America’s tissue business. Conference presenters will offer inspiration and interaction on these major themes:
 

Resilience

  • Supply-side volatility and risk with a focus on fiber supply.
  • Human risk factors such as attracting and retaining skills.
  • Reliance on supplier knowledge as opposed to in-house skill.
  • Cyber security and the vulnerabilities that increase with greater connectivity.

Operational Game Changers

  • Change drivers such as sustainability — including the need to ditch single-use plastics, its implications through the supply chain and the potential gains from upgrading.
  • Assessing the return on investment of upgrading America’s tissue-making assets.
  • Managing change – from evolving routes to market to technological adaptation imposed by such external factors as legislation and customer demand.

Buyer Expectations

  • Trends and forecasts.
  • The contrasting shopper propositions of in-store vs. online.
  • AfH – the rise of e-commerce and the challenge of cut-price entrants.

For more information about Tissue World Miami 2020, visit:

Registration: https://www.tissueworld.com/miami/en-us/register

Exhibitor List: https://exhibitors.informamarkets-info.com/tissue-world-miami-2020/

Conference Sessions: https://www.tissueworld.com/miami/en-us/conferencesessions

ABOUT TISSUE WORLD MIAMI

Tissue World Miami is part of the Tissue World international tissue industry event portfolio established in 1993. The portfolio includes trade shows and conferences serving the tissue industry in the Americas, Europe, Middle East and Asia. Tissue World publishes Tissue World magazine, the independent news resource for the global tissue business.

ABOUT INFORMA MARKETS

Informa Markets is the leading global platform for industries, specialist markets and communities to trade, grow and engage. It consists of more than 550 international B2B events and brands, as well as specialist digital content and data solutions, with over 4,400 colleagues based in more than 40 countries around the globe. Informa Markets provides customers with meaningful experiences where they can engage, experience and do business, helping global communities to thrive 365 days a year. INFORMA PLC/S trades on the OTCMKT under ticker symbol IFJPY.

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MTORRES DISEÑOS INDUSTRIALES, S.A.U. and UNIVERSAL TISSUE TECHNOLOGY, Srl, have just announced the acquisition by MTORRES of Universal Tissue Technology (UTT). The company will operate under the name of MTORRES TISSUE.

This new MTORRES TISSUE brand will be able to supply and serve customers worldwide with a full range of highly flexible and productive complete automatic tissue converting lines, both for Consumer and Away‐from‐Home segments.

2017 04 07 073228

The merger of two experienced teams becoming one leverages innovative technology from different sectors and enables MTORRES TISSUE to provide exceptional value to our customers.

Founded in 1975, with 800 employees, more than 700 customers and thousands of machines worldwide, MTORRES specializes in Splicers, Unwinders and Rewinders for all industry sectors that involve web handling such as Tissue, Corrugated, Flexible Packaging, Liquid Packaging, etc.

UNIVERSAL TISSUE TECHNOLOGIES, was created in 2013, and is a young and growing Italian Company with a highly‐experienced team in the design, manufacturing and service of complete automatic tissue lines.

See more at www.mtorrestissue.com or www.mtorres.com

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With Papermaking 4.0, Voith is introducing its networked solutions to increase the efficiency, productivity and quality of the entire paper production process supply chain. In addition, Voith will be showcasing NipcoFlex T, a shoe press developed to reduce energy con-sumption and raw material in tissue production. At Tissue World, which is taking place in New Orleans from March 15 to 17, trade visitors will find Voith at stand E 240.

  • Papermaking 4.0 increases productivity and quality
  • NipcoFlex T lowers production costs
  • Find Voith at exhibition stand E 240

voith logo 2016Systems like OnCare and OnEfficiency are solutions that stem from the new Papermaking 4.0 concept. OnCare facilitates the maintenance management of paper machines, from planning, servicing and documenta-tion through cost control to spare parts management. The permanent monitoring of the entire paper machine allows optimization potentials to be identified and preventive maintenance measures to be planned and implemented. Preventive maintenance reduces unscheduled downtimes and the paper machine’s availability will increase. Unlike conventional software solutions, OnCare represents a complete maintenance concept, with the distinctive feature being that data are already embedded in the software system. Likewise, it is possible to integrate OnCare in existing systems.

In addition, Voith also developed OnEfficiency to maximize the paper ma-chine’s potential. OnEfficiency Forming gets right to the process at the heart of papermaking: sheet formation. This is measured and analyzed with a package of sensors so that dewatering, retention and flocculation can be stabilized and at the same time coordinated. As a result of the sta-ble process, raw materials and chemicals can be saved and energy usage reduced. Voith is a specialist in the entire paper manufacturing process and ensures that its customers benefit from a dependable documentation of practical experience in papermaking process management.

The increase in machine efficiency and improvement of paper quality are also at the core of the NipcoFlex T. At various paper mills, the innovative shoe press from Voith has already demonstrated that it can increase productivity and reduce costs. NipcoFlex T offers the benefits of up to 5% higher dry content, representing up to 20% thermal energy savings or up to 20% higher production, while maintaining the same or better paper quality. The production parameters of the press can be monitored online and re-adjusted if necessary.

Alfredo Sarli, Sales Manager at Voith Paper Air Systems, will be providing further insights into the latest work on tissue papers in his presentation “Energy Optimization of the Yankee Dryer Hood” to be held at 9:10 am on March 16, 2016 at the conference running alongside Tissue World.

About Voith Paper

Voith Paper is a corporate division of Voith and is one of the leading partners and pioneers in the paper industry. Through constant innovations, Voith Paper is optimizing the paper manufacturing process, focusing on developing resource-conserving products to reduce the use of energy, water and fibers. Furthermore, Voith Paper offers a broad service portfolio for all sections of the paper manufacturing process.

About the company

Voith sets standards in the energy, oil & gas, paper, raw materials and transport & automotive markets. Founded in 1867, Voith today has more than 20,000 employees and earns €4.3 billion in sales. It has locations in over 60 countries and is one of the large family-owned companies in Europe.*
* Excluding the discontinued Group Division Voith industrial Services.

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buckmanBuckman, a global specialty chemical company with expertise in creping, is showcasing its portfolio of innovative tissue and toweling products at Tissue World in Barcelona, Spain, March 17-19 . Buckman offers tissue manufacturers worldwide an unmatched combination of new technology, application and technical expertise. 

Exciting new technologies include Buckman’s TAD+sm Yankee dryer adhesive system for the through air dried process. This package removes process limitations that have been associated with the TAD process since its inception. The TAD+ coating package provides high levels of wet tack which allow the tissue manufacturer to significantly increase the moisture transfer at the Yankee and this in turn results in reduced energy consumption and increased production rates. 

The development and application of novel on-machine softeners, giving tissue manufacturers access to a lotion-like feel from a product applied on the tissue surface prior to the Yankee instead of in converting. This technology can be used in isolation or with the hugely successful Buckman® 691 softening technology applied in the wet end.

About Buckman
Buckman is a privately held, global specialty chemical company with headquarters in Memphis, Tenn., USA. Buckman works proactively and collaboratively with worldwide customers in pulp and paper, leather and water treatment to deliver exceptional service and innovative specialty chemical solutions. Buckman's goal is to help customers boost productivity, reduce risk, improve product quality and provide a measurable return on investment. Buckman is committed to safeguarding the environment, maintaining safety in the workplace and promoting sustainable development, for its associates, its customers and its communities in more than 90 countries around the world.
Published in Exhibitions

NOW is the time to register for the Tissue World Americas Conference next week in Miami Beach! Over 350 conference delegates from 32 countries are already signed up to be part of the Conference Meeting Sessions and an additional 500 Trade Show Visitors are already pre-registered.

To be held under the theme of -

"Boosting Performance for Better Quality, Sustainability and Profitability”

the conference program features nearly 60 speakers and topics which are sure to be of interest to you:

  • Senior executives from Kimberly-Clark, Greenpeace, Cascades, SCA, FSC and EcoLogo in a top-level panel discussion on Sustainability in the Tissue Business
  • Market Developments and Fiber Supply session looking deeply at Market Developments in North and South America as well as Where the Fiber for Tissue Making Will Come From
  • Yankee Dryer Summit, held for the first time in Miami, covering a full day and going into critical technical details on Yankee reliability, efficiency and sustainability
  • Technical sessions and workshops featuring world-leading experts giving timely, concise knowledge on key areas such as paper making, energy, converting wrapping, logistics, stock prep and other crucial topics.

And the Best Networking Opportunity available to pick up ideas and solutions to the operational and profitability challenges you face in your plants  and your company

To Register NOW --- CLICK HERE

To see the full conference program --- CLICK HERE.

Published in Tissue World 2012
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The Tissue World Americas conference meeting sessions on March 20-23 will likely be the largest ever held in Miami. In the past 3 weeks close to 200 new participants have registered, bringing the total to more than 325 tissue professionals already. And many more are planning to join. 

 
The attraction is a great program of speakers covering a very timely combination of critical tissue topics:

  • Sustainability and Environmental Challenges of Today and Tomorrow
  • Dynamic Market Expansions, and Quality Upgrades, in both North and South America
  • Fiber Supply Trends, Flows and Scenarios
  • New Technology Giving Higher Quality and Efficiency on a Sustainable Footprint
  • Yankee Dryer Operations aimed at optimum Reliability, Efficiency, and Sustainability
  • . . . and Much More covering all aspects of the tissue business

 

There is something for everyone in Miami Beach at Tissue World Americas. You can simply attend one day, or several, or all four, depending on your areas of interest. To join the hundreds already registered, you can sign up now by clicking here.
 
Click here to see the list of conference participants ALREADY REGISTERED.

 

To learn more about the complete program of speakers, please read below.

Conference Theme:
Boosting Performance for Better Quality, Sustainability and Profitability

Main conference sessions – Wednesday to Friday

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Wednesday March 21, 2012 (full day)

Session 1: Sustainability in the Tissue Business

Steps Toward the Sustainable Value Chain for Tomorrow
Suhas Apte, Global Vice President of Sustainability, Kimberly-Clark Corporation, USA
      The historical sustainability focus of manufacturing companies, optimizing operational footprints and minimizing environmental impacts, is evolving to one of ensuring sustainability across their entire supply chain (from raw materials to shelf). Going forward, our scope needs to be expanded to consider our business’s value chain in a way that we become part of the solutions addressing the greater global challenges affecting us and our stakeholders. This will need to be demonstrated under the heightened transparency expected by our consumers and customers. We should expect that these trends will only be exacerbated in the World of 2050, inhabited by 9 billion consumers, where sustainable production and consumption is no longer nice to have but rather a requirement. This paper will outline steps companies can undertake to proactively address existing and emerging sustainability related global value chain challenges and opportunities.

Greenpeace: No Reason to be Afraid, Necessarily
Rolf Skar, Sr. Forest Campaigner, Greenpeace, USA
      Indonesia's rainforests and carbon-rich peatlands are being destroyed to make disposable consumer products, including paper for glossy magazines, toilet paper and packaging. Greenpeace -- along with a growing list of NGOs -- is campaigning to find solutions to deforestation in Indonesia. We invite the tissue industry to join this effort, if not for the environmental and social values, for the sake of the bottom line. As consumers increasingly demonstrate an interest in sustainability, companies ignoring rainforest destruction in their supply chain do so at their own risk.

Making Sense of Environmental Certifications Programs
Suzanne Blanchet, President and CEO, Cascades Tissue, Canada
Abstract – To be announced

Where Environmental Groups and Big Brands Combine Forces
Corey Brinkema, President, Forest Stewardship Council (FSC), USA
    The Forest Stewardship Council (FSC), the certification system that uniquely brings together companies and environmental scientists and activists, is in the midst of a remarkable marketplace expansion in North America. Having already attained a 5% share of the forest products market, both FSC demand and supply have exploded in the past 18 months. The tissue sector suddenly became more attuned to certification opportunities with the market leadership of Kimberly-Clark, and Clearwater Paper recently made FSC a reality for the retail grocery private label tissue. Where does it go from here? How much does the US consumer care? Where are the future sources of FSC certified fiber in the Americas? This paper will address these questions and share insights of recent US consumer research on responsible sourcing and purchasing of forest products.

Environmental Leadership in the Tissue Paper Sector – Beyond Forest Certification
Susan Rutherford, Sustainability Analyst, Ecologo, Canada
    While public debate about the environmental impacts of paper production are focusing on the role of forestry certification, producing paper in a more sustainable manner requires attention to environmental and other impacts at all life cycle stages of the product; from land and resource management, to emissions associated with manufacture to end of life recyclability. This presentation will review the major life cycle impacts of the paper production sector, particularly in the manufacturing stage and identify some leadership practices resulting in environmentally preferable paper products. Practices covered will include design, sourcing recycled content, air, water and waste management practices and energy production and management both for on site production and purchased energy.

How Customers Can Leverage Your Sustainability
Don Lewis, President, SCA North America, USA
     Building a strong sustainable profile has become a requirement for companies in today’s world. However, when customers leverage your reputation to build their own, you’ve become a value-added business partner and much more than a supplier. Don Lewis, president of SCA’s Americas operations, will discuss how SCA is adding value to customers through the company’s sustainability actions and programs. SCA is a global hygiene products and paper company with sustainability recognition that has placed it as one of the world’s most ethical companies by Ethisphere, on the Carbon Disclosure Leadership Index, FTSE4Good Index and the Dow Jones Sustainability Europe Index. With sales in 100 countries, SCA operates across North and Latin America with hygiene products such as tissue, incontinence and feminine care products and baby diapers. Sales for SCA in 2011 were $16 billion

Session 2: Market Developments and Fiber Supply

Market Developments and Trends in North and South America
Esko Uutela, Principal - Tissue, RISI, Germany
    The North American tissue market is experiencing a new investment boom. The main driver seems to be the need for ultra and premium grade tissue, partly reflecting major retailers' target to upgrade their private label offerings closer to the main brands in quality, with a clear trend toward higher quality in the AfH sector as well. Market growth has flattened, particularly in terms of weight as the product light-weighting trend continues. Competition does not show any signs of lessening, and it is amazing to see how a growing number of small, independent converters have been able to forge ahead based on niche products, flexible service and sub-contracting orders from big players. Environmental certification and sustainability issues are also becoming increasingly important topics in the North American tissue business. In South America, tissue markets are in a very interesting expansion phase throughout the whole continent. The main focus is currently on Brazil, with the largest population and now also the highest tissue consumption in the region. In Brazil, the recent strong growth is benefitting from the increasing purchasing power in the inland and northeast regions. On the supply side, CMPC Tissue's recent aggressive expansion strategy has tightened competition further in Latin America, including the two largest markets Brazil and Mexico.

Fiber Supply – Where will Fiber for Tissue Making Come From?
Soile Kilpe, Director Global Consulting, Pöyry, USA

    The tissue industry is the second largest consumer of market pulp, after printing and writing paper. Market bleached hardwood and softwood kraft pulp usage is clearly increasing in the at-home (consumer) tissue segment, driven by the new investments in Asia and Latin America. About 40% of all market pulp is bought by the top 5 tissue producers today, but with the steady investment activity in the low per capita regions, and increasing number of new entrants, this share will change as fragmentation rises. Integration with pulp production at tissue mills varies by region and certain at-home tissue suppliers have transitioned to using market pulp by closing down or selling their pulp assets. Moreover, captive pulp for tissue making has declined in North America, but with the fiber poor regions like Asia growing, there will be a comeback of this kind of a concept for securing fiber supply. Reduced availability and higher price of recycled fiber is expected to benefit market pulp suppliers in the future. However, the cyclical nature of the market pulp business will continue to be a challenge for tissue producers, as they have high sensitivity to raw material input cost swings. This presentation will explore key questions related to tissue product quality development, the impact of technology/recycled fiber, sustainability drivers and the potential
need for new pulp products for the ultra-quality category.

Session 3: Papermaking Developments

The Chattermark Project to Reduce Operational costs at ICT Iberica, ICT and BTG
World's First Tissue Machine with a Compact Wet End with Active Degassing, Aikawa Fiber Technology and LC Paper
Development Trends in Pressing for Tissue, Metso
Seamless Tissue Plant Concept Plus: Entry level Technology for Private Labels, Comer
New Pressing Technology for Higher Bulk and Dryness on Conventional Machines, Voith
Yankee Dryer System: Critical Asset Protection, Monitoring and Control, Nalco
New TAD Simulator provides Tissue Makers a Competitive Edge, Ashland
Towel Wet End Optimization: Utilizing Strength Additives and Functional Promoters, Kemira

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Thursday March 22, 2012 (full day)

Session 4: Energy Reduction and Savings

Forecasting and Validation of Fossil Fuel and Steam Savings from Tissue Machine Heat Recovery, Thermal Energy and Kruger Products
Steam Energy Reduction in Tissue Drying Process, Andritz
Significant Energy Savings with Variable Speed Blowers in Tissue Paper Production, Runtech Systems
Making 100% High Pressure Steam with a new Post Combustor on Hood exhaust, Novimpianti
Biogas for the Yankee Hood, AMEC

Session 5: Converting, Packaging, Wrapping and Logistics

Colored Laminating Glues for Design Embossing, Kapp-Chemie
TCO: Total Cost of Ownership Analysis Spells Informed Investment, Futura
6 Different Products are just One Click Away, Gambini
Integrate to Innovate, The Next Steps in Packaging Efficiency, TMC
Compact Packaging of Tissue Paper, Optima
Overall Equipment Effectiveness: How Next Generation Automation Gives Real Improvements, Schneider Equipment
Conveying Lines: Optimizing Energy, Maintenance, Product Quality and Safety, Pulsar
New Concepts in Robotic Palletizing: Product Handling Methods, Multiple SKU Management and Flexibility, E80
New Robotic Bundler Combines Packaging and Palletizing Technology, W+D Langhammer
Reducing Costs and Improving Operations with Automatic Guided Vehicles, JBT Corp.

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Friday March 23, 2012 (half day)

Session 6: Stock Prep

New Insights into the Application of High-yield Pulp in Tissue and Towel, Tembec/FP/Kruger
First Mill Experience with a new High Efficiency Compact Refiner, Metso
Compression Refining, Flexible Fibres and low Fines Content, Wageningen UR

Session 7: Auxiliary Topics in Tissue Making

Carbon Fiber Composite Materials for Tissue Rewinding Reel Spools, Double E
Improve Operator Safety and Reduce Downtime with Automatic Web Marking on a Tissue Line, Ryeco
Studies Reveal Unnecessary Fiber, Energy and Water Losses, Tecumseth Filtration
Guarding Operations - Engineering Safety for Tissue Converting Lines, SEACON
Recognized Standard Locations for Dust Concentration Testing, Brunnschweiler
Maintaining Optimum Performance of Tissue Machine Clothing, Dubois Chemicals

Published in Tissue World 2012
Tagged under
Tuesday, 06 December 2011 17:39

Tissue World Americas Conference

Dear Tissue Industry Professional!

The tissue business continues to grow at a very nice pace, especially in comparison with many other businesses. In the Americas, particularly, many tissue companies are in an interesting phase of expansion with growing market demand for higher quality tissue products stimulating new investments. These trends and developments will certainly be a topic of discussion when the Tissue Industry meets at Tissue World Americas in Miami Beach on March 20-23, 2012.

To help bring the wide range of topics impacting the tissue industry in North and South America into even sharper focus, we have assembled an excellent program of speakers for the Tissue World Americas conference. To be held under the theme of -

"Boosting Performance for Better Quality, Sustainability and Profitability"

the conference includes many highlights which are sure to be of interest to you:

  • Senior executives from Kimberly-Clark, Greenpeace, Cascades, EcoLogo, SCA North America and more in a panel discussion on Sustainability in the Tissue Business
  • Market Developments and Fiber Supply session looking deeply at Market Developments in North and South America as well as Where the Fiber for Tissue Making Will Come From
  • Yankee Dryer Summit, held for the first time in Miami, covering a full day and going into critical technical details on Yankee reliability, efficiency and sustainability
  • Technical sessions and workshops featuring world-leading experts giving timely, concise knowledge on key areas such as paper making, energy, converting wrapping, logistics, stock prep and other crucial topics.
  • As well as the Best Networking Opportunity available to pick up ideas and solutions to the operational and profitability challenges you face in your plants  and your company

To Register NOW  ---  CLICK HERE 

 

Here is a more detailed look at the sessions:

 

Main conference sessions – Wednesday to Friday

 

Wednesday    March 21, 2012 (full day)

 

Conference Theme:
Boosting Performance for Better Quality, Sustainability and Profitability

 

Session 1: Sustainability in the Tissue Business

 

Steps Toward the Sustainable Value Chain for Tomorrow
Suhas Apte, Global Vice President of Sustainability, Kimberly-Clark Corporation, USA

 

Greenpeace: No Reason to be Afraid, Necessarily
Scott Paul, Forest Campaign Director, Greenpeace, USA  

 

Making Sense of Environmental Certifications Programs
Suzanne Blanchet, President and CEO, Cascades Tissue, Canada

 

Environmental Leadership in the Tissue Paper Sector – Beyond Forest Certification

 

Angela Griffiths, Executive Director, EcoLogo, Canada

 

SCA North America, Speaker to be Named

 

Session 2: Market Developments and Fiber Supply

 

Market Developments and Trends in North and South America
Esko Uutela, Principal - Tissue, RISI, Germany

 

Fiber Supply – Where will fiber for tissue making come from?
Saara Söderberg, Director Global Consutling, Pöyry, Finland

 

Session 3: Papermaking Developments

 

The Chattermark Project to Reduce Operational costs at ICT Iberica, ICT and BTG

 

World's First Tissue Machine with a Compact Wet End with Active Degassing, POM and LC Paper

 

New TAD Simulator provides Tissue Makers a Competitive Edge, Ashland

 

Seamless Tissue Plant Concept Plus: Entry level Technology for Private Labels, Comer

 

New Pressing Technology for Higher Bulk and Dryness on Conventional Machines, Voith

 

Yankee Dryer System: Critical Asset Protection, Monitoring and Control, Nalco

 

Development Trends in Pressing for Tissue, Metso

 

Session 4: Energy Reduction and Savings

 

Forecasting and Validation of Fossil Fuel and Steam Savings from Tissue Machine Heat Recovery, Thermal Energy and Kruger Products

 

Steam Energy Reduction in Tissue Drying Process, Andritz 

 

Significant Energy Savings with Variable Speed Vacuum Pumps in Tissue Making, Runtech Systems 

 

Making 100% High Pressure Steam with a new Post Combustor on Hood exhaust, Novimpianti

 


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Thursday   March 22, 2012 (full day)

 

Session 5: Converting, Packaging, Wrapping and Logistics

 

Colored Laminating Glues for Design Embossing, Kapp-Chemie

 

TCO: Total Cost of Ownership Analysis Spells Informed Investment, Futura

 

6 Different Products are just One Click Away, CMG

 

Compact Packaging of Tissue Paper, Optima

 

Overall Equipment Effectiveness: How Next Generation Automation Gives Real Improvements,Schneider Equipment

 

Conveying Lines: Optimizing Energy, Maintenance, Product Quality and Safety, Pulsar

 

New Concepts in Robotic Palletizing: Product Handling Methods, Multiple SKU Management and Flexibility, E80

 

New Robotic Bundler Combines Packaging and Palletizing Technology, W+D Langhammer

 

Reducing Costs and Improving Operations with Automatic Guided Vehicles, JBT Corp.

 


Workshops on various areas such as Printing, Web Handling and Knives and Blades

 

The program of speakers for these workshops is presently under development. More details will be coming soon.

 

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Friday March 23, 2012 (half day)

 

Session 6: Stock Prep

 

First Mill Experience with a new High Efficiency Compact Refiner, Metso

 

New Insights into the Application of High-yield Pulp in Tissue and Towel, Tembec/FP/Kruger

 

Compression Refining, Flexible Fibres and low Fines Content, Wageningen UR

 

Evaluation of Furnishes for Tissue: New Research Results on Suction Box Dewatering and Pressing, Karlstad University

 

Session 7: Auxiliary Topics in Tissue Making

 

Improve Operator Safety and Reduce Downtime with Automatic Web Marking on a Tissue Line, Ryeco

 

Studies Reveal Unnecessary Fiber, Energy and Water Losses, Tecumseth Filtration

 

Guarding Operations - Engineering Safety for Tissue Converting Lines, SEACON

 

Recognized Standard Locations for Dust Concentration Testing,Brunnschweiler

Maintaining Optimum Performance of Tissue Machine Clothing, Dubois Chemicals

Published in Tissue World 2012
Tagged under
Page 1 of 2

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