Displaying items by tag: WWF International

WWF presents the results of the Environmental Paper Company Index 2017, a WWF tool to promote transparency and continual improvement in the global pulp, paper and packaging sector. The Index is published for the fifth time. Together, the EPCI 2017 participants from Europe, South America, Africa, Asia and North America disclose the environmental performance of 26% of the world´s tissue, 23% of the world´s graphic paper, 17% of the world´s newsprint, 9% of the world´s packaging and 15% of the world´s pulp. South America has taken a leadership role in participation this year with the disclosure of over 50% of the total volume of pulp and paper produced in the region.

2015 03 18 115559“The willingness by many companies to participate every two years in WWF’s Environmental Paper Company Index, many for the third time, is an important signal that transparency is increasingly valued across the globe and that the EPCI is positively received as a voluntary mechanism to encourage this transparency” said Alistair Monument, Leader, WWF Forest Practice.

WWF´s EPCI tracks how a company´s performance on responsible sourcing, clean production and EMS/reporting changes over time. The Index is based on voluntary data disclosure by invited participants on over 50 indicators that WWF considers important for a company´s ecological footprint. WWF publishes collated results company by company and shows a historical timeline since 2013. By doing so, the Index helps track companies’ and also the sectors’ journey towards sustainability. Find the results of all participating companies on epci.panda.org.

“WWF´s EPCI is a valuable tool for companies to reflect on their operations,” said Trevor Walter, WWF´s Pulp and Paper Southern Alliance Coordinator. “Given the scale and footprint of the industry in our region, it is heartening to see more South American companies participating in the EPCI than ever before, and we hope this will encourage further transparency in the sector.” 33% of the pulp purchased globally comes from South America. Over half of all pulp and paper exports from the region go to China and the EU and demand as well as production continue to increase.

“Paper is a renewable, recyclable material, with a potentially lower footprint than substitute materials if managed and produced responsibly. However, the sector's size and impacts are expanding”, said Cecilia Alcoreza, WWF´s global lead on Sustainable Paper and Packaging. “This is why it is crucial for companies to demonstrate leadership in transparency and a commitment to continual improvement, reducing the sector´s forest, climate and water footprint.”

The bi-annual Environmental Paper Company Index started in its current form in 2010 and has since increased in scale and global reach.

The 2013, 2015 and 2017 Index results are comparable and allow assessments of continual improvement over time. Due to some changes in the methodology, the results of 2010 and 2011 are not fully comparable to the later evaluations. Company scores are not ranked.

WWF’s Living Forests Report 1 projects paper production and consumption may double in the next three decades, and overall wood consumption may triple.

About WWF

WWF is one of the world’s largest and most respected independent conservation organizations, with over 5 million supporters and a global network active in over 100 countries. WWF's mission is to stop the degradation of the earth's natural environment and to build a future in which humans live in harmony with nature, by conserving the world's biological diversity, ensuring that the use of renewable natural resources is sustainable, and promoting the reduction of pollution and wasteful consumption.

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WWF launches the Chinese version of WWF´s global online tool “Check your Paper”, designed to support the China Sustainable Paper Alliance (CSPA) in engaging strategic market players on responsible paper products procurement and sales. The launch coincides with the RISI Asian Forest Products Summit and a panel discussion by the CSPA on the “Challenges and Opportunities for Increasing Responsible Fiber Use in Asia”.

CYP China image

On the direct request of the WWF-led China Sustainable Paper Alliance, parts of the online platform “checkyourpaper.panda.org” were translated into Chinese.  “Check Your Paper and especially the private Self- Check section have been successful in the US and Europe in helping suppliers demonstrate to buyers sustainability and discuss improvements,” said  Emmanuelle Neyroumande, WWF´s Global Manager Pulp and Paper . “We believe that this initiative will be very much welcomed by customers and traders of Chinese pulp and paper products all over the world. It will give importers the ability to work closely and in confidence with their Chinese suppliers.”

The Chinese Sustainable Paper Alliance (CSPA) aims to promote the development of responsibly sourced paper products in China, together with leading producers and buyers of paper products. It was founded in 2015 by WWF and the Chinese Forestry Industry Association. In a training organised by the Alliance on 20 June in Shanghai, around 70 persons from over 35 companies were supported on responsible procurement issues linked to pulp and paper and on how to eliminate and avoid illegal and controversial sources in their supply chains. How to use WWF´s online tool Check your Paper was also part of the training.

Designed for all the main pulp and paper categories, Check your Paper offers a non-public Self-Check but also allows to publish brands publicly. The basis for Check your Paper is a simple but scientifically robust method in evaluating a paper product’s footprint, developed by WWF together with scientists, paper buyers, producers and NGOs. It reduces complexity in evaluating the forest, water and climate performance of individual paper brands.
 
“Check Your Paper not only helps pulp & paper suppliers to proactively evaluate forest, climate and water performance of their products, but also provides buyers with a database to choose more environmental friendly paper products. We hope more Chinese companies can use this tool to increase the transparency of their supply chain and benefit from what they have done”, said Wenbin Huang, Forest Manager of WWF China.
 
 Founding members of the China Sustainable Paper Alliance include 11 domestic and international companies covering the whole supply chain of China's pulp and paper industry: China Paper, China's biggest state-run paper company, Sun Paper, the country's largest private paper company; the global producers Kimberly-Clark, International Paper, UPM, SIG Combibloc, Stora-Enso and Fibria, as well as buyers such as HP, Fuji Xerox and IKEA.

The pulp and paper industry in China has an enormous opportunity to positively influence global forests. Over  the  course  of  the  last  decade  China  tripled  its  paper  production  and  in 2008 became the world's biggest paper producer, increasing the importance of responsible procurement. Given the lack of domestic supply of fibre, China has become the world’s biggest importer of pulp, including from WWF Priority Places.

Based on the online platform Check Your Paper WWF will issue the WWF Environmental Paper Awards 2016 in November 2016.  Proactive use of WWF´s Online Self-Check is part of the Award criteria. Details on the Award can be found on wwf.panda.org/environmentalpaperaward2016

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2015 03 18 115559Eleven global hotspots will account for over 80 per cent of forest loss by 2030, according to research released today by WWF.

Up to 170 million hectares of forest could be lost between 2010 and 2030 in these “deforestation fronts” if current trends continue, according to findings in the latest WWF’s Living Forests Report.

The fronts  - the Amazon, the Atlantic Forest and Gran Chaco, Borneo, the Cerrado, Choco-Darien, the Congo Basin, East Africa, Eastern Australia, Greater Mekong, New Guinea and Sumatra - contain some of the richest wildlife in the world, including endangered species such as orangutans and tigers. All are home to indigenous communities. 

Rod Taylor, Director of WWF’s global forest programme said:

“Imagine a forest stretching across Germany, France, Spain and Portugal wiped out in just 20 years.”

“We must tackle that risk to save the communities and cultures that depend on forests, and ensure forests continue to store carbon, filter our water, supply wood and provide habitat for millions of species.”

WWF analysis shows that more than 230 million hectares of forest will disappear by 2050 if no action is taken.  Forest loss must be reduced to near zero by 2020 to avoid dangerous climate change and economic losses.

WWF-UK’s Chief Adviser on Forests, Will Ashley-Cantello said:

“Deforestation needs to stop if we are to reverse biodiversity loss and combat climate change – which, if unchecked, will affect our quality of life.

“Managing forests sustainably could underpin sustainable development, poverty alleviation and a stable climate around the world.  2015 should be a year of action locally, nationally and globally – and Britain can play a key role in driving change by shaping new UN Sustainable Development Goals and working for an ambitious global climate deal.”

Globally, the biggest cause of deforestation is expanding agriculture – including commercial livestock, palm oil and soy production, but also encroachment by small-scale farmers.  Unsustainable logging and fuelwood collection - or “death by a thousand cuts” - contributes to forest degradation, while mining, hydroelectricity and other infrastructure projects bring new roads that open forests to settlers and agriculture.

WWF-UK is campaigning to close EU loopholes that mean Britain still contributes to the illegal trade in timber products, and calling on British businesses to buy wood only from sustainable sources. 

Will Ashley-Cantello said:

“Here in the UK you can still buy furniture, books, cards and other products made from illegally or unsustainably sourced wood.  EU rules to prevent the exploitation of forests only cover half of traded products.  The next UK government should lobby hard to end this nonsense.”

The Living Forests Report will be published at the Tropical Landscapes Summit: A Global Investment Opportunity, an international gathering of political, business and civil society leaders in Jakarta, Indonesia.

Despite a recent slowdown, deforestation remains a major issue in Indonesia. Sumatra has lost more than half of its natural forests due to paper and palm oil plantations, and the remaining forest is severely fragmented. WWF projections show that another 5 million hectares of forest could be lost by 2030.

EU rules governing the trade in timber products are due for review in 2015.  WWF is campaigning to close loopy loopholes that contribute to the destruction of the world’s forests, and is working with colleagues in Europe to ensure that the regulation is implemented and enforced effectively across all 28 Member States. 

The Living Forests Report aims to catalyse debate on the future role and value of forests in a world where humanity is living within the Earth’s ecological limits and sharing its resources equitably.

The Living Forests Model, which WWF developedwith the International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis, forms the basis for the Living Forests Report. panda.org/livingforests

About WWF

WWF is one of the world's largest and most respected independent conservation organizations, with over 5 million supporters and a global network active in over 100 countries. WWF's mission is to stop the degradation of the Earth's natural environment and to build a future in which humans live in harmony with nature, by conserving the world's biological diversity, ensuring that the use of renewable natural resources is sustainable, and promoting the reduction of pollution and wasteful consumption.

Visit panda.org/news for latest news and media resources

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2015-04-21 113443With today’s launch of the online Environmental Self-check, WWF provides an improved service to pulp and paper manufacturers globally for company internal usage. The five online steps to check the environmental footprint of pulp and paper brands can be filled out confidentially. The Environmental Self-check is a new feature of WWF´s Check Your Paper, a public database of brands with high environmental standards (checkyourpaper.panda.org)

“WWF wants to offer an additional service to producers to support continual improvement efforts. With the Environmental Self-check we encourage companies to test their products with our method and verify their environmental performance. Companies can download their scores for company internal usage and discussions without any cost or obligations,” said Emmanuelle Neyroumande, Pulp and Paper Global Manager, WWF International “Of course we encourage them to also publish their scores subsequently, to show leadership in transparency.”

The Environmental Self-check is based on a method which reduces the complexity of assessing the forest and manufacturing footprint of pulp and paper products. Previously called “Scorecard”, it was developed upon request by and with support of large buyers, and in consultation with scientists, NGOs and producers. The Check Your Paper method is already being used across regions and for different products. WWF now also encourages the use of the method in supplier screening tools, for example those of retailers and other large buyers of pulp and paper.

The public Check Your Paper database has further a new focus on featuring pulp and paper products with high environmental standards and a low forest, water and climate footprint. As part of the improved Check Your Paper, WWF will offer more opportunities for transparent leaders in the sector to get public recognition for published brands. All third party audited brands will automatically participate in the Environmental Paper Awards 2016 which will be issued for Best Environmental Performance paper
brands and the most transparent producers.

Rod Taylor, Director Forests for Life Programme, WWF International said “At a time of increasing interest in supply chain risks worldwide, the Check Your Paper Method offers an opportunity for suppliers and buyers to work together to reduce their environmental footprint.”

For further information:
Helma Brandlmaier, Senior Advisor Strategic Communications and Knowledge Management, WWF International Tel: +43676842728219 This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
 
Check Your Paper (checkyourpaper.panda.org) has been designed as a user-friendly tool to help paper purchasers and manufacturers to evaluate their environmental footprint. With the help of the Check Your Paper scheme, also responsible merchants and other distributors can verify and demonstrate the quality of the products they sell. This scheme aims to channel paper consumption and production towards alternatives with the least harmful environmental impacts. It focuses on a limited number of major impacts related to the health and vitality of humans and ecosystems, including:

  • forest impacts through wood harvesting
  • greenhouse gas emissions
  • water pollutants
  • wastes

CYP is based on parameters and the rating system of the WWF Paper Scorecard that was initially launched 2007. The parameters and criteria were updated early 2010, with substantial input from more than 30 key paper sector players, including number of globally largest paper manufacturers, paper merchants, paper buyers and non- governmental organisations from Europe, North America, Latin America and Africa.

Rating categories on Check Your Paper are defined as follows:

  • Excellent 90-100%: These products have an excellent environmental performance.
  • Very good 80-89%: These products have a very good environmental performance.
  • Good 60-79%: These products have a good environmental performance.
  • Fair (lower than 60%): These products are on the right path and showcase the transparency of the producer/merchant.

About WWF
WWF is one of the world’s largest and most respected independent conservation organizations,  with over 5 million supporters and a global network active in over 100 countries. WWF's mission is to stop the degradation of the earth's natural  environment  and to build a future  in which humans live in harmony with nature, by conserving the world's biological diversity, ensuring that the use of renewable natural resources is sustainable, and promoting the reduction of pollution and wasteful consumption.

WWF´s Forests for Life Programme  has a long standing track record working with companies.  Check Your Paper is part of WWF’s global Forests for Life Programme´s efforts to motivate continual improvement in the forest  products  sector  and  to  promote  sustainable  consumption  For  more  information,  visit www.panda.org/forests

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2015 03 18 115559WWF, the world´s largest conservation organisation, is inviting the world’s leading pulp and paper manufacturers to participate in the Environmental Paper Company Index 2015. The biannual Index promotes transparency and continual improvement in the sector. The list of invited manufacturers from Europe, North America, South America, Asia and Africa can be viewed on  www.panda.org/epci2015. Results of the evaluation will be published in October/November 2015.

The increasing number of participants in WWF´s Environmental Paper Company Index over the years is a testimony to the growing importance of transparency and the value of the Index for the industry. Participants in the 2013 Index produced 29% of the world´s newsprint, 28% of the world´s graphic paper, 14% of the world´s tissue, 6% of the world´s packaging and 14% of the world´s pulp. This means that the ecological footprint of 82 million tonnes of pulp and paper was disclosed.

WWF's Environmental Paper Company Index looks at environmental aspects of a company’s policies and targets, as well as the environmental performance of the production of newspaper grades, graphic paper, packaging, tissue, or pulp. The EPCI recognizes a company´s transparency and progress over time, without comparing the companies.

“We are expecting even higher participation in 2015” says Emmanuelle Neyroumande, Manager of WWF International’s global pulp and paper work. “While we are proactively inviting key pulp and paper producers we are open to receiving expressions of interest from other producers. The EPCI is a tool for companies that are striving for continual improvement in the environmental performance of their pulp and paper production. The Index enables them to be leaders in transparency.”

“Mondi encourages all invited companies to participate in WWF´s Environmental Paper Company Index (EPCI). We believe it is good for the industry to demonstrate increased transparency – showcasing responsible business practices and ongoing improvements. This will be Mondi’s fourth year of participating in the Index and we consider it a fair and positive exercise, providing useful management insights.” Mondi (South Africa)

"Participating in WWF’s Environmental Paper Company Index is a great opportunity to have a well-known environmental organization with high ambitions evaluate and confirm continuous improvement of sustainability performance." Stora Enso (Europe)

“We welcome WWF's Environmental Paper Company Index. The EPCI measure will aid ITC's efforts at enriching the country's environmental capital while generating significant sustainable livelihood opportunities. The EPCI tool will enable current and prospective customers to objectively view the environmental performance of the products that they buy from pulp, paper and paperboard companies" ITC (India)

"Domtar has gained significant insights from our work with WWF the past five years to create the expectation of full disclosure within the industry. As the only North American fine paper manufacturer to participate in the EPCI since its inception, we encourage our peers to follow suit. It’s impossible to verify economic, social and environmental performance without complete transparency.” Domtar (Canada)

Companies that have not been invited but would like to participate can contact the WWF International Paper Team at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. Deadline for applications to participate is 30th of April 2015.

For further information:
Helma Brandlmaier, Senior Advisor Strategic Communications and Knowledge Management, WWF International Tel: +43676842728219 This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Participants in the EPCI 2013 (newsprint, graphic paper, household and sanitary, packaging paper and boards, pulp)

Appleton Coated (North America), Arauco (South America), Arjowiggins Graphic (Europe), BillerudKorsnäs (Europe), Bio-PAPPEL (Central America), Cascades (North America), CMPC (South America), Domtar (North America), Fedrigoni (Europe), Fibria (South America), ITC (Asia), Klabin (South America), Lecta (Europe), Lenzing Papier (Europe), Metsä Group (Europe), Mondi (South Africa), NewPage (North America), Norske Skog (Europe), Resolute Forest Products (North America), SCA (Europe), Södra (Europe), Sofidel (Europe), Stora Enso (Europe), TNPL/Tamil Nadu (Asia), UPM (Europe). See also  www.panda.org/epci2013

Participants in the EPCI 2011,
x     Fine paper category: Arjowiggins Graphic, Burgo, Cascades, Domtar, Fedrigoni, Mondi, M-real, Stora Enso, Suzano, UPM
x     Packaging category: Cascades, Korsnäs, Mondi, SCA Containerboard
x     Tissue paper category: Arjowiggins Graphic, Metsä Tissue, Renova, SCA Tissue, Sofidel

Participants in the EPCI 2010
Fine paper category: Mondi, M-Real, Stora Enso, UPM, Domtar

The EPCI method looks at environmental aspects of a company’s policies and targets, as well as the environmental performance of the overall production of a specific product category (newsprint, graphic paper, household and sanitary, packaging paper and boards, pulp). It includes the environmental performance from own pulp and paper production, as well as performance of market pulp purchased. It has been reviewed and adapted with input of the participants in 2012.

About WWF
WWF is one of the world’s largest and most respected independent conservation organizations,  with over 5 million supporters and a global network active in over 100 countries. WWF's mission is to stop the degradation of the earth's natural  environment  and to build a future  in which  humans live in harmony with nature, by conserving the world's biological diversity, ensuring that the use of renewable natural resources is sustainable, and promoting the reduction of pollution and wasteful consumption.
WWF´s  Forests  for  Life  Programme  has  a  long  standing  track  record  working  with  companies  towards continual improvement  within the forest and paper sectors and to increase supply chain transparency.  The Environmental  Paper  Company  Index is one  of WWF´s  Forests  for Life  Programme´s  efforts  to motivate continual improvement in the forest products sector. For more information, visit www.panda.org/forests
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2015 02 11 091825

Two High Street retailers have recently sold greetings cards that could be contributing to forest destruction. The testing, organised by WWF-UK and carried out by a laboratory in Germany, tested 20 cards and envelopes. Three products, bought from Paperchase, the Card Factory and Clinton’s contained various amounts of Mixed Tropical Hardwood (MTH), meaning that the fibres had most likely come from natural growth tropical forests.

Of the three retailers, one, Paperchase, seems able to provide evidence that their product was from a sustainable source. This highlights the need for firms to carefully scrutinise their supply chains to reassure themselves and their customers that their products are not contributing to forest destruction.

More cards are bought per person in the UK than in any other country, with an average of 31 per person bought every year, and last year the UK market for greeting cards was valued at £1.29 billion. Due to legislative loopholes, it is possible to legally sell imported cards that have been made from illegally-logged or cleared forests. WWF wants the loopholes closed and firms to take proper responsibility for their supply chains. WWF believes consumers should be confident that the cards they buy are not contributing to the illegal logging or unsustainable harvest of forests in places like South East Asia.

Beatrix Richards, Head of Corporate Stewardship Timber and Seafood, WWF, said;
“These results suggest that the true cost of our Valentine’s card could be far greater than the price on the wrapping. They may be contributing to the further loss of some of the most valuable forests in the world. Companies that rely on forests for their raw materials should scrutinise their supply chains, and reassure consumers that they are buying cards made from recycled or sustainable materials.”

Over thirty UK businesses have already signed up to WWF’s Forest Campaign that will help enable a market in 100% sustainable timber and wood products by 2020, including Carillion Kingfisher, Tesco, Marks and Spencer and Travis Perkins.

Deforestation is an issue affecting some of our most important natural forests around the world, and with global demand for wood set to triple by 2050, businesses and countries need to get their act together in order to ensure a sustainable supply for the future.

The European Timber Regulation (EUTR), which came in to force in March 2013, was set up across Europe to remove illegally sourced timber from the EU markets.
Due to loopholes in the EUTR it is currently legal to import certain goods made from illegally sourced wood, such as greetings cards, musical instruments or books. These exemptions mean that some firms may be unwittingly or deliberately purchasing materials from dubious sources.

20 cards and envelopes from three outlets were tested by the Institution for Paper Science and Technology in Darmstadt, Germany.
The lab results found that one from each of the stores contained MTH (Mixed Tropical Hardwood):

Card Factory – 10% MTH (in the card itself)

Clintons – 8% MTH (in a paper component of the card)

Paperchase – 5% MTH (in the envelope)

The results shown here are products on the market in the UK that contain pulp from natural growth tropical forests – in this case, probably SE Asia.   In addition all of the products contained acacia, which carries a risk of being grown in plantations that have been created on recently cleared tropical forest.

More information on WWF’s forest campaign can be found at  www.wwf.org.uk/saveforests

FAO’s State of the World’s Forests 2014 report outlined key findings on just how critical forest resources are to billions of people worldwide for their livelihoods. Forest provide them with socio-economic benefits including employment, fuel,, water and shelter. 

Global deforestation rates are currently estimated at around 13 million hectares per annum, which is equivalent to an area the size of a football pitch being cut down every two seconds.
The EU Timber Regulation (EUTR) came into force in March 2013. It covers a wide range of timber and wood products, as listed in its annex using EU customs code labelling. The EUTR also applies to timber products whether they were harvested in the EU or outside.

EU member states are responsible for overseeing and applying the law – which means that all 28 EU countries must take active steps, and designate appropriate resources, to do so.

For the EUTR to work in practice it will need the active participation of industry, government and civil society stakeholders, as well as even implementation across the EU. 
Following the publication of WWF report on what is in or out of scope of the regulation, it is clear that the EUTR only covers 41% of all products by value. There are a wide range of products not covered by the regulation such as greetings cards, musical instruments and books.

WWF is one of the world’s largest independent conservation organisations, with more than five million supporters and a global network active in more than one hundred countries. Through our engagement with the public, businesses and government, we focus on safeguarding the natural world, creating solutions to the most serious environmental issues facing our planet, so that people and nature thrive.  Find out more about our work, past and present at wwf.org.uk.

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WWF has invited the world’s most important and strategically relevant paper manufacturers, representing 25% of global wood pulp production and 35% of global paper and paperboard production, to participate in the third edition of its Environmental Paper Company Index (EPCI). 70 leading paper manufacturers from Europe, North America, Latin America, Asia and Africa have been identified as potential leaders in promoting transparency and continual improvement in paper manufacturing. The list is publicly available on wwf.panda.org/epci2013 

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The EPCI started in its current form in 2010 and is one of WWF’s key tools to promote and reward transparency and continual improvement to reduce the environmental footprint of paper production. The index is produced every two years. It offers an opportunity for paper producers in all product sectors to set a signal for transparency on environmental performance and to receive public recognition from the leading conservation organization WWF. 

“Transparency is increasingly recognized by the industry as an important aspect of their operations, and many companies today make efforts on transparency in various ways,” says Emmanuelle Neyroumande, Manager of WWF International’s global pulp and paper work. “WWF´s Environmental Paper Company Index facilitates a better understanding of complex data sets by focusing on the most important parameters and filtering them through an environmental lense.” 

In 2012, the EPCI method was reviewed in cooperation with paper manufacturers from around the world in order to improve its global applicability and relevance. WWF also changed the EPCI to focus on a reference format, presenting collated results per company rather than presenting a comparison matrix. 

“All participating companies will be applauded for being transparent on their environmental performance, which is more important than actual results in this exercise,” says Neyroumande. “The new reference rather than comparison format of the EPCI will hopefully make it attractive for more producers to take part.”

Deadline for participating is 30th of June 2013.

Companies that have not been invited but would like to participate can contact the WWF International Paper Team at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

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WWF welcomed the announcement by the Sinar Mas Group’s Asia Pulp & Paper (APP) stopped clearing Indonesia’s tropical forests and peatlands to allow an assessment of their conservation and carbon values. But the conservation organization urged paper buyers to wait for confirmation of the claims through independent monitoring by civil society before doing business with APP.

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“APP today committed to most of WWF’s calls. If the company follows through on this, it could be great news for Indonesia’s forests, biodiversity and citizens,” said Nazir Foead, Conservation Director of WWF-Indonesia. 

“Unfortunately, APP has a long history of making commitments to WWF, customers and other stakeholders that it has failed to live up to. We hope this time the company does what it promised. WWF plans to independently monitor APP’s wood sourcing and forestry activities for compliance with its commitments and regularly update stakeholders on the findings,” Foead added.

APP runs two of the world’s largest pulp mills on Sumatra, where it produces the pulp for the toilet paper, tissue, copy paper and packaging that it sells worldwide. The company and its wood suppliers are responsible for clearing more than 2 million hectares of rain forest on the island since beginning operations in 1984, an analysis by the NGO coalition Eyes on the Forest found. 

“WWF hopes that APP’s new commitments will do more than just stop its own bulldozers, including protecting the natural forests in its concessions from all illegal activities and mitigating the long-term negative impacts its practices have had on all the peat lands, forests, biodiversity and local people in Sumatra and Borneo for which these commitments have come too late,” Foead added. 

“WWF has long called on responsible businesses to avoid sourcing from APP and until there is truly independent confirmation that APP has stopped draining peat soils and pulping tropical forests with high conservation value, we continue to urge paper buyers to adopt a wait for proof stance,” said Aditya Bayunanda, GFTN and pulp & paper manager of WWF Indonesia.

Mr Teguh Widjaya, the patriarch of the family’s pulp and paper business, oversaw the announcement today that no member of his APP group operating in Indonesia or China will accept any tropical timber felled in Indonesia after 31 January 2013 until company consultants have completed a full “high conservation value” and a “high carbon stock” assessment of their forest concessions. 

However, the company inserted a loophole in the commitment saying that for an indefinite period of time APP mills would accept trees felled before 31 January.

As a sign of good faith and the first demonstrable milestone, WWF calls on APP to have moved the supply of already-cut tropical timber its suppliers cleared before the self-imposed 31 January 2013 moratorium by 5 May 2013, the due date of its next quarterly forest policy report.

A fully implemented moratorium on pulping forests with high conservation and high carbon value would have a profound impact on Indonesia’s biodiversity, as well as on Indonesia’s carbon emissions. WWF urges all of the country’s pulp producers to stop using tropical forests.

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By 2050, rising population and demand, as well as an increase in use of wood for bioenergy, could triple the amount of wood society takes from forests and plantations per year, according to the latest instalment of WWF’s Living Forests Report[1]. The report, presented today at the international paper conference Paperworld in Frankfurt, projects paper production and consumption may double in the next three decades, and overall wood consumption may triple.

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“A scenario of tripling the amount of wood society takes from forests and plantations needs to motivate good stewardship that safeguards forests – otherwise we could destroy the very places where wood grows,” says Rod Taylor, Director of WWF’s Global Forest Programme. “Wood, if sourced from well managed forests or plantations, is a renewable material with many advantages over non-renewable alternatives. The key challenge for forest-based industries is how to supply more wood products with less impact on nature. This challenge spans the whole supply chain, from where and how wood is grown and harvested to how wisely and efficiently it is processed, used and reused.”

WWF’s forest conservation target is zero net deforestation and forest degradation by 2020, which means no overall loss of forest area or forest quality. The target requires the loss of natural forests to be reduced to near zero, down from the current 13 million hectares a year, and held at that level indefinitely.

“WWF’s research suggests that it is possible to achieve zero net deforestation and forest degradation while sustaining a vibrant wood products industry that meets people’s needs,” says Emmanuelle Neyroumande, Manager of WWF International´s global pulp and paper work. “But the longer we delay our actions the more difficult and costly the solutions will be. We need wiser consumption, more efficiency, responsible forestry practices, good governance and more transparency.”

For paper in particular, the Living Forests Report outlines a variety of solutions:

More recycling in countries with low recovery rates: Even with higher global paper consumption in the future, society would need less virgin material than today if recycling rates increased. A 2020 scenario shows that an increase of paper production by 25 per cent could still require less virgin fibre input if the current global level of 53 per cent recycled fibre use is increased to 70 per cent. Paper recovery rates vary greatly between countries. Therefore, efforts to increase recycling in countries with low recovery rates and high consumption growth have particular potential to reduce pressure on natural forests.

Resource efficiency and fairer consumption patterns: More efficient processing and manufacturing can help produce more products with a given amount of wood. Also, the current consumption patterns of rich nations (10 per cent of the world’s population consuming 50 per cent of the world’s paper) cannot sustainably be followed by developing countries. Richer nations can reduce wasteful paper use, while poorer nations need more paper for education, hygiene and food safety.

Plantations to reduce pressure on natural forests: Even with more frugal use and greater recycling and efficiency, net demand for wood is likely to grow. Maintaining near zero loss of natural forests after 2020, without significant reductions in consumption, would require up to 250 million hectares of new tree plantations by 2050, which is nearly double the amount of plantations today. Therefore, well-managed plantations, particularly on currently degraded land, contributing to restore ecosystems, will play an increasingly important role.

Well-managed forests: Growing demand will also certainly push production further into natural forests. The report indicates that by 2050 up to 25 per cent more forests might be commercially harvested than today. Forest certification will continue to be an important tool to improve forest management practices via a market driven mechanism.

The energy challenge: By 2050, annual wood demand for energy could reach 6-8 billion m3, which would require more than twice the wood removed for all uses today. This clearly poses a challenge for sustainable land-use planning. WWF sees an important role for bioenergy to provide diverse alternatives to fossil fuels, plus new incomes and increased energy security for rural communities. However, for these benefits to be realized, its use must be carefully planned, implemented and monitored for environmental and social sustainability. Badly managed bioenergy production can destroy valuable ecosystems, undermine food and water security, harm rural communities and prolong wasteful energy consumption.

Humanity will likely use more wood in more ways in the coming decades. Given the massive projected increase in wood and paper demand, forest-based industries are key to conserving forests. For wood to play a positive role in a “green” economy based on renewable resources, production forestsneed to be managed to the highest ecological and social standards, and the use and recovery of wood products must become more efficient. 

For further information:

Helma Brandlmaier, Senior Advisor Paper Footprint and Market Change, WWF International

Tel: +43676842728219 This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

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