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WWF has just published its 6th Environmental Paper Company Index (EPCI 2019), a voluntary tool to increase transparency and awareness on how the pulp, paper and packaging sectors can reduce their footprint. The EPCI tracks companies performance on responsible sourcing, clean production, Environmental Management Systems (EMS) and reporting. This assessment comes ahead of the significant 2020 milestone by which many global companies pledged to have fully eliminated deforestation from their supply chains. The pulp and paper sector plays a crucial role in achieving these commitments as growing demand for paper, particularly virgin fiber, is adding pressure on our remaining natural forests, aquatic ecosystems, biodiversity, wildlife and climate change. The Index spurs companies to become more transparent in disclosing sustainability data, and in that way, helps companies report progress on their commitments to the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, the Bonn Challenge and New York Declaration on Forests, among others.

EPCI 2019 covers a significant percentage of total global production in the following categories: newsprint (13%), graphic paper (16%), tissue (15%), packaging (9%) and pulp (10%). The Index brings together almost 300 mills of which 48% are located in Europe, 22% in North America, 22% in South and Central America, 7% in Asia and 1% in Africa.

2019 11 26 101737Overall, the assessment shows that participating companies are obtaining 76% of the maximum points for responsible fiber sourcing, 70% for clean manufacturing, and 64% for  Environmental Management Systems (EMS) and transparency in reporting. The average score of 70% is slightly less compared to the overall performance in the EPCI 2017 (73%). An important trend to note is the overall reduction of FSC certified sourced fiber and the use of recycled materials for all product categories except packaging. More transparency is also needed indicates the lowest score (63%) on environmental reporting. 

Given the fast-growing importance of the pulp and paper sector in Asia, WWF carried out an additional special assessment based on public information of two large Chinese companies (Lee & Man Paper Manufacturing and Nine Dragons Paper Holding), and one Japanese company (Daio Paper Corporation). These companies were invited but chose not to voluntarily disclose information on their performance and transparency. Together, they represent nearly 5% of global total pulp and paper production while Lee & Man Paper Manufacturing and Nine Dragons Paper Holding alone represent around 8% of total global packaging production.

“Asia is the most dynamic region with paper and paperboard representing almost half of the world’s production, says Mauro Ciriminna, Senior Advisor Sustainable Pulp, Paper, and Packaging, WWF Forest Sector Transformation. “In the past, it has been challenging to get Asian based companies on board. Therefore the inclusion of 7 Asian companies in this year’s EPCI is an important development. Asian based companies can and should play a crucial role in improving their practices in deforestation fronts, increasing Forest Stewardship Council (FSC) certification and promoting responsible paper production and consumption.”

This year, 30 out of 84 invited companies took part in the Index (including the 3 companies from the special assessment) with 4 new companies voluntarily joining also: Ence and Lecta (Spain) JK Paper (India), and Nippon Paper (Japan). Together, these companies represent 18% of total production of pulp and paper manufacturers worldwide.

Through the Index, WWF wants to spur the pulp and paper industry to take a leading role in reducing the sector’s footprint by increasing recycling practices and sourcing more responsibly certified fiber from timber producers and pulp and paper suppliers.

“Recycled material plays a central role in achieving a circular economy and should become the industry´s first choice to reduce pressure on virgin fiber and worldwide forests. Globally, if companies used more post-consumer recycled and FSC-certified fiber, they would score much better,”says Ciriminna.

Recycled material is particularly important for tissue, mainly used in end-of-use products. FSC certification is a key strategy for companies to eliminate deforestation from their supply chains because it reduces environmental impacts and protects High Conservation Value forests among other requirements. According to the WWF Certification Assessment Tool , FSC is the most credible forest certification scheme.

Efforts in clean manufacturing greatly vary: several companies have strategies and targets on the reduction of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. But whilst no waste should end up in landfills, only few participating companies scored well on this point. Mills can find many ways to reuse the waste from production like recycling paper which saves water and energy in the production process, as well as reducing air, water, and land pollution.

By 2050, the consumption of paper will double and maybe even further increase with the pressure to substitute plastic for paper. WWF estimates that over 250 million hectares of plantation will be needed to meet our future global demand, even with higher levels of recycled material. WWF calls on the sector to change the status quo and deliver now by improving the sustainability of its supply chain and offering consumers a responsible choice.

More information about EPCI and the detailed company results are available on epci.panda.org.

About WWF

WWF is one of the world's largest and most respected independent conservation organizations, with over 5 million supporters and a global network active in over 100 countries.  WWF's mission is to stop the degradation of the earth's natural environment and to build a future in which humans live in harmony with nature, by conserving the world's biological diversity, ensuring that the use of renewable natural resources is sustainable, and promoting the reduction of pollution and wasteful consumption. More information: panda.org/forests

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WWF presents the results of the Environmental Paper Company Index 2017, a WWF tool to promote transparency and continual improvement in the global pulp, paper and packaging sector. The Index is published for the fifth time. Together, the EPCI 2017 participants from Europe, South America, Africa, Asia and North America disclose the environmental performance of 26% of the world´s tissue, 23% of the world´s graphic paper, 17% of the world´s newsprint, 9% of the world´s packaging and 15% of the world´s pulp. South America has taken a leadership role in participation this year with the disclosure of over 50% of the total volume of pulp and paper produced in the region.

2015 03 18 115559“The willingness by many companies to participate every two years in WWF’s Environmental Paper Company Index, many for the third time, is an important signal that transparency is increasingly valued across the globe and that the EPCI is positively received as a voluntary mechanism to encourage this transparency” said Alistair Monument, Leader, WWF Forest Practice.

WWF´s EPCI tracks how a company´s performance on responsible sourcing, clean production and EMS/reporting changes over time. The Index is based on voluntary data disclosure by invited participants on over 50 indicators that WWF considers important for a company´s ecological footprint. WWF publishes collated results company by company and shows a historical timeline since 2013. By doing so, the Index helps track companies’ and also the sectors’ journey towards sustainability. Find the results of all participating companies on epci.panda.org.

“WWF´s EPCI is a valuable tool for companies to reflect on their operations,” said Trevor Walter, WWF´s Pulp and Paper Southern Alliance Coordinator. “Given the scale and footprint of the industry in our region, it is heartening to see more South American companies participating in the EPCI than ever before, and we hope this will encourage further transparency in the sector.” 33% of the pulp purchased globally comes from South America. Over half of all pulp and paper exports from the region go to China and the EU and demand as well as production continue to increase.

“Paper is a renewable, recyclable material, with a potentially lower footprint than substitute materials if managed and produced responsibly. However, the sector's size and impacts are expanding”, said Cecilia Alcoreza, WWF´s global lead on Sustainable Paper and Packaging. “This is why it is crucial for companies to demonstrate leadership in transparency and a commitment to continual improvement, reducing the sector´s forest, climate and water footprint.”

The bi-annual Environmental Paper Company Index started in its current form in 2010 and has since increased in scale and global reach.

The 2013, 2015 and 2017 Index results are comparable and allow assessments of continual improvement over time. Due to some changes in the methodology, the results of 2010 and 2011 are not fully comparable to the later evaluations. Company scores are not ranked.

WWF’s Living Forests Report 1 projects paper production and consumption may double in the next three decades, and overall wood consumption may triple.

About WWF

WWF is one of the world’s largest and most respected independent conservation organizations, with over 5 million supporters and a global network active in over 100 countries. WWF's mission is to stop the degradation of the earth's natural environment and to build a future in which humans live in harmony with nature, by conserving the world's biological diversity, ensuring that the use of renewable natural resources is sustainable, and promoting the reduction of pollution and wasteful consumption.

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Monday, 28 November 2016 11:49

106 paper brands get WWF Awards 2016

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The WWF Environmental Paper Awards 2016, issued today, go to 106 paper brands for environmental performance, 5 paper producers for product transparency and 13 paper producers/merchants for their continual improvement efforts.

WWF created the WWF Environmental Paper Awards to recognise and encourage company efforts in reducing the forest, water and climate footprint of paper production. WWF´s Check your Paper Method, which is simple but scientifically robust, is the basis for the WWF Environmental Paper Awards 2016. Winners1 are awarded in 3 categories – access details here www.panda.org/paperawards2016

  1. 106 paper products receive the WWF Environmental Paper Awards 2016 in the category “Best Environmental Performance Paper Brands”. The Award winning brands have been published on WWF´s online database of Eco Rated papers with a third party audit and reach at least 80% of achievable scores. They come from the following 8 producers/merchants: Antalis McNaughton, Arjowiggins Graphic, LEIPA, Mondi (Fine Paper), SCA (Graphic paper and Newsprint), Sofidel, Steinbeis and UPM (Graphic Paper).
     
  2. 5 paper producers receive the WWF Environmental Paper Awards 2016 for “Transparency” on their Products´ footprint: Arjowiggins Graphic, LEIPA, Mondi (Fine Paper), SCA (Graphic Paper and Newsprint) and Steinbeis. These companies published the majority of paper brands in at least one product category on WWF´s checkyourpaper.panda.org
     
  3. 13 companies receive the WWF Environmental Paper Awards 2016 in the category “Striving For Continual Improvement”: Appleton Coated, BillerudKorsnäs, Burgo, Denmaur, Fedrigoni, Lecta, Lucart, Metsä Tissue, Mondi (Packaging), PaperWise, Rolland Enterprises, Södra Cell and Van Houtum. The companies have been proactive in assessing the forest, water and climate footprint of a number of paper brands for company internal purposes, using WWF´s Check your Paper Method.

“Pulp, paper and packaging products can be environmentally sound. For wood to play a positive role in a “green” economy based on sustaining and advancing the use of renewable resources, production forests need to be managed to the highest ecological and social standards, and the use and recovery of wood products must become more efficient”, says Cecilia Alcoreza, WWF´s new Global lead on Paper and Packaging. “We encourage paper buyers to work with their suppliers in all regions of the world towards improvements and to reward high environmental, social and governance goals in pulp and paper production.”

Most of today´s Award winners also participate in WWF´s bi-annual Environmental Paper Company Index (EPCI) and allow WWF to evaluate the company´s overall performance and targets over time. The EPCI 2015 covered 15% of the world´s paper and board and 15% of the world´s pulp production and will be published again in 2017. “WWF´s Environmental Paper Company Index and WWF´s Check your Paper help the sector gain more credibility and give participants valuable opportunities to engage with customers”, says Helma Brandlmaier, WWF´s Senior Advisor Forest Sector Accountability. “Companies also get useful benchmarking information for free”.

WWF is managing two key accountability tools to encourage continual improvement in the pulp and paper sector: WWF´s Check your Paper focuses on brand level performance (and is the basis for the WWF Environmental Paper Awards); the WWF Environmental Paper Company Index looks at a company´s overall performance, including targets. Both accountability tools are aligned in their methods and are based on voluntary participation by companies. They are designed for all the main pulp and paper categories including coated and uncoated papers, newsprint, tissue, packaging and board papers, speciality papers and pulp.


About WWF
WWF is one of the world’s largest and most respected independent conservation organizations, with over 5 million supporters and a global network active in over 100 countries. WWF's mission is to stop the degradation of the earth's natural environment and to build a future in which humans live in harmony with nature, by conserving the world's biological diversity, ensuring that the use of renewable natural resources is sustainable, and promoting the reduction of pollution and wasteful consumption.

WWF´s has a long standing track record working with companies towards continual improvement within the forest and paper sectors and to increase supply chain transparency. WWF´s Check your Paper platform and the WWF Environmental Paper Company Index are key accountability tools to motivate and reward continual improvement in the forest products sector. For more information, visit www.panda.org/forests

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WWF launches the Chinese version of WWF´s global online tool “Check your Paper”, designed to support the China Sustainable Paper Alliance (CSPA) in engaging strategic market players on responsible paper products procurement and sales. The launch coincides with the RISI Asian Forest Products Summit and a panel discussion by the CSPA on the “Challenges and Opportunities for Increasing Responsible Fiber Use in Asia”.

CYP China image

On the direct request of the WWF-led China Sustainable Paper Alliance, parts of the online platform “checkyourpaper.panda.org” were translated into Chinese.  “Check Your Paper and especially the private Self- Check section have been successful in the US and Europe in helping suppliers demonstrate to buyers sustainability and discuss improvements,” said  Emmanuelle Neyroumande, WWF´s Global Manager Pulp and Paper . “We believe that this initiative will be very much welcomed by customers and traders of Chinese pulp and paper products all over the world. It will give importers the ability to work closely and in confidence with their Chinese suppliers.”

The Chinese Sustainable Paper Alliance (CSPA) aims to promote the development of responsibly sourced paper products in China, together with leading producers and buyers of paper products. It was founded in 2015 by WWF and the Chinese Forestry Industry Association. In a training organised by the Alliance on 20 June in Shanghai, around 70 persons from over 35 companies were supported on responsible procurement issues linked to pulp and paper and on how to eliminate and avoid illegal and controversial sources in their supply chains. How to use WWF´s online tool Check your Paper was also part of the training.

Designed for all the main pulp and paper categories, Check your Paper offers a non-public Self-Check but also allows to publish brands publicly. The basis for Check your Paper is a simple but scientifically robust method in evaluating a paper product’s footprint, developed by WWF together with scientists, paper buyers, producers and NGOs. It reduces complexity in evaluating the forest, water and climate performance of individual paper brands.
 
“Check Your Paper not only helps pulp & paper suppliers to proactively evaluate forest, climate and water performance of their products, but also provides buyers with a database to choose more environmental friendly paper products. We hope more Chinese companies can use this tool to increase the transparency of their supply chain and benefit from what they have done”, said Wenbin Huang, Forest Manager of WWF China.
 
 Founding members of the China Sustainable Paper Alliance include 11 domestic and international companies covering the whole supply chain of China's pulp and paper industry: China Paper, China's biggest state-run paper company, Sun Paper, the country's largest private paper company; the global producers Kimberly-Clark, International Paper, UPM, SIG Combibloc, Stora-Enso and Fibria, as well as buyers such as HP, Fuji Xerox and IKEA.

The pulp and paper industry in China has an enormous opportunity to positively influence global forests. Over  the  course  of  the  last  decade  China  tripled  its  paper  production  and  in 2008 became the world's biggest paper producer, increasing the importance of responsible procurement. Given the lack of domestic supply of fibre, China has become the world’s biggest importer of pulp, including from WWF Priority Places.

Based on the online platform Check Your Paper WWF will issue the WWF Environmental Paper Awards 2016 in November 2016.  Proactive use of WWF´s Online Self-Check is part of the Award criteria. Details on the Award can be found on wwf.panda.org/environmentalpaperaward2016

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wwf logo pandaWWF is now inviting pulp and paper producers, paper buyers, agents and merchants to participate in WWF´s Environmental Paper Awards 2016. Awards in the categories “Best Environmental Performance Paper Brands”, “Transparency”, “Striving for Continual Improvement” and “Advocacy for Continual Improvement” will be celebrated in November 2016. WWF created the WWF Environmental Paper Awards to give credit to company efforts in reducing the forest, water and climate footprint of paper production and consumption.

In cooperation with scientists, paper buyers, producers and NGOs, WWF has developed a simple but scientifically robust method in evaluating a paper product’s footprint. The method is the basis for the online platform “checkyourpaper.panda.org” which allows producers and merchants to either do a non-public self-check on their paper brands, or to publish their brands publicly. Buyers and merchants can find brands with a low forest, climate and water footprint, but can also use the tool to work with their suppliers towards improvements.

In the last WWF Environmental Paper Awards in 2012, seven paper producers were recognized for transparency and 46 paper brands for environmental excellence.  All paper products currently published on checkyourpaper.panda.org will automatically enter the Environmental Paper Awards 2016. Whereas the Awards primarily focus on brands, a company´s participation in the bi-annual Environmental Paper Company Index, which evaluates a company´s overall performance and targets, is part of the criteria in the category “Transparency”.

New Award categories in 2016 on “Striving for Continual Improvement” and “Advocacy for Continual Improvement” seek to recognise efforts by paper buyers and merchants in working collaboratively with their suppliers and customers in pursuit of improved environmental footprints. This requires proactive use of WWF´s Online Self-Check and/or the underlying method on checkyourpaper.panda.org.  

“The WWF Environmental Paper Awards will recognize the efforts of producers and buyers/merchants that are transparent on their environmental footprint or act as advocates for continual improvement in the pulp and paper sector,” said Emmanuelle Neyroumande, Manager of WWFs global paper work.

In November 2016, WWF International will publicly recognize the Award winners on WWF´s website, via trade media outreach and communication to environmentally conscious paper buyers around the world. Details on how to enter the Awards can be found on wwf.panda.org/environmentalpaperaward2016. Deadline for submissions for all categories is 30 September, 2016. Contact This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

For further information: Helma Brandlmaier, WWF International ; +43676842728219 This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

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wwf logo pandaUsing wood more efficiently to meet projected demand for wood-based products in Europe should be at the heart of the European Commission’s bioenergy strategy and circular economy, according to a new report.

The report, Mapping Study on Cascading Use of Wood Products[1], commissioned by WWF and global packaging and paper group Mondi, looks at how regulation either hinders or promotes what is known as ‘cascading use’ of wood – prioritising value adding non-fuel uses so wood is burned for energy only after it has been used, re-used and recycled as a material first wherever possible.

“Demand for wood-based materials and energy is projected to increase threefold worldwide between 2010 and 2050. We urgently need to innovate and make more products from fewer resources to help reduce pressure on our forests”, says Emmanuelle Neyroumande, Manager: Forest Product Consumption & Footprint at WWF International.
 
“Cascading use of wood is the smart way to use a natural resource – putting it to good use before it is reused, recycled and finally burnt for energy. Taking wood straight from the forest and burning it just doesn’t make sense if it can be used for other products first”, says Peter Oswald, CEO Mondi Europe and International.
 
The report's findings suggest the need for: a broadly accepted definition of cascading use among policymakers, researchers and industry; EU policy guidance that incentivises effective cascading use; as well as better integration and implementation of existing bio-energy and waste policies.

At a national level, the analysis found that countries such as Finland and Germany had practices that promote cascading wood use and recycling; and that while others like Spain had advanced policies in place, these were challenged by poor integration with other policies.
 
It also revealed that the need for cascading use was felt more acutely in countries with relative scarcity of wood resources, such as Germany, and more weakly in countries with a relative abundance, such as Poland.  In Germany, where 50% of the wood resource (recycled or virgin) is used for bioenergy, increasing demand could only be satisfied by imports, more cascading use or the expansion of the forest area from which wood can be harvested.
 
We urge the European Commission to take the report’s recommendations into account for the sustainable bioenergy policy up to 2030 and as they take forward activities related to the circular economy. We believe the Commission needs to provide guidance to the Member States on how best to integrate cascading use of wood into relevant national policies.
 
The European Commission consultation on a sustainable post-2020 bioenergy strategy is now open until 10 May 2016.
                                                                        ###
Read Mapping Study on Cascading Use of Wood Products

WWF has published a position paper, which states that “Cascading use of biomass as well as combined heat and power production need to be incentivised where appropriate" (WWF 2012). Mondi has a similar position, aligned to the one of CEPI, which is to “Place the cascading use principle at the core of its climate and energy policy, with a view to ensure the most efficient use of the available biomass, in particular to contribute to the EU growth and jobs objectives”.

About the WWF Mondi Global Partnership
Mondi Group and WWF are working together in a three-year strategic partnership (2014 to 2016) that focuses on promoting environmental stewardship in the packaging and paper sectors.
The partnership enables shared learning and action to promote ecosystem, manufacturing and product stewardship.

Thorough its initiative, the partnership aims to demonstrate that environmental stewardship and responsible business practice can, and need to go hand in hand. It also hopes to catalyse widespread positive change in the global packaging and paper sector and beyond
For more on the partnership please visit: www.panda.org/mondipartnership  

[1] The report is based on research from the nova-Institute and the Institute for European Environmental Policy (IEEP)

WWF
Emmanuelle Neyroumande
Manager: Forest Product Consumption & Footprint  
Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Mobile: +33 6 62 10 74 78
 
Mondi Group
Lora Rossler
Group Head of Communications
Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Tel: +27 31 451 2111

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Friday, 26 February 2016 08:39

Brazils new forest code: guide 2016

2015 03 18 115559The Forest Code in Brazil is a piece of legislation on land management that legally requires that landowners in the Brazilian Amazon should permanently maintain a proportion of the land (80%) as forest. It was passed in 1965 but with little implementation until it was revised in 2012. Since then new legal instruments have been introduced which should lead to better environmental management and land use planning in Brazil including the reforestation, restoration or offset of historically illegally deforested areas.

Produced by WWF-Brazil, this guide provides an overview of the updated Forest Code in Brazil and gives recommendations for decision makers in supply chain companies, financial institutions and Governments on how to take action to implement and ensure compliance to the Forest Code. It is particularly important for those in the supply chain who promote, regulate, produce, consume, export or import Brazilian agricultural and forest commodities.

Brazils new forest Code: guide 2016 PDF

WWF Guide to the Forest Code:

With the Forest Code serving as a first step towards fully legal and responsible agricultural production, cattle ranching and forestry production in Brazil it is important for companies sourcing from Brazil to ensure compliance with it. WWF has produced a new guide providing information on the Forest Code law, and outlining some recommendations to ensure effective implementation of the law. It also highlights precisely why we need to go even further to protect forests in Brazil, particularly if we are to achieve zero net deforestation and forest degradation (ZNDD) by 2020.

TheForest Code is the law that regulates land management and the protection of native vegetation on Brazilian properties. It came into force in 2012 and was revised in 2014 to include new regulations  and new legal instruments for implementation.

Our guide to the code:

  • Explains the main components of the law, with a supplement that explains the law in more detail, for example examining how compensation for incompliance can work, and how it can benefit biodiversity.
  • Gives short case studies on how the sugarcane, beef, pulp and paper, soybean industries might implement the code (pages 32-35)
  • Provides recommendations for the international community, buyers and producers, financiers, and public sector
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WWF, the conservation organisation, has developed a free and non-public management tool to assist companies along the whole pulp and paper supply chain in their efforts towards greater sustainability and credibility. The online environmental Self-Check is a valuable support tool both within companies and for communication between buyers and sellers.

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Mills, merchants, agents, publishers as well as paper and print buyers can immediately benefit from the online Self-Check of the forest, water and climate performance of paper and fibre based packaging products - for entirely private or internal use. The online Self-Check on checkyourpaper.panda.org is easy to use and reduces complexity in evaluating a paper’s footprint by using relatively few, but carefully selected, environmental indicators. There are no fees or cumbersome registration procedures.

Concretely, the Self-Check tool can support a company’s internal decision making between sales, marketing, production/technical and procurement divisions. It can help to communicate the environmental performance of products to merchants and direct customers without the need for results to be made public, unless both parties want this. Printers and publishers can also request that their suppliers provide a Self-Check summary on products they intend to buy. Mills and their customers can use the tool to reduce reputational risks - for both mill brands and customer brands - and to work together towards improvements with the help of concrete indicators.

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“Self-Check is invaluable as a means of independent verification for the end user and will further the promotion of sustainable paper products”, said Danny Doogan, Group Sustainability Manager, Denmaur Independent Papers Ltd.

"Pulp, paper and packaging can be very green", said Rod Taylor, Director of WWF’s Global Forest Programme, “The Self-Check is a powerful and free tool to help companies improve the environmental credentials of their products”.

 “We were getting a lot of positive feedback from producers and buyers about the original Check Your Paper but not all companies wanted to publish their brand results online. The new environmental Self-Check supports continual improvement efforts, however outside of the public arena”, said Emmanuelle Neyroumande, Manager of WWFs global paper work.

The environmental Self-Check is based on a simple but scientifically robust method that was developed by WWF in cooperation with scientists, paper buyers, producers and NGOs.

For further information:
Helma Brandlmaier, Senior Advisor Strategic Communications and Knowledge Management,
WWF International Tel: +43676842728219 This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

The online Self-Check on checkyourpaper.panda.org is based on a method which reduces complexity in evaluating a paper’s footprint by focusing on a limited number of important environmental indicators including fossil CO2 emissions, waste going to landfill, water pollution, how well forests supplying the fibre are managed and the use of recycled or agricultural fibre. Next to this non-public support tool for companies, Check your Paper features also a public database for pulp and paper products with high environmental standards. The public as well as the non-public interface are designed for all the main pulp and paper categories including coated and uncoated papers, newsprint, tissue, packaging and board papers, speciality papers and pulp.

About WWF
WWF is one of the world’s largest and most respected independent conservation organizations, with over 5 million supporters and a global network active in over 100 countries. WWF's mission is to stop the degradation of the earth's natural environment and to build a future in which humans live in harmony with nature, by conserving the world's biological diversity, ensuring that the use of renewable natural resources is sustainable, and promoting the reduction of pollution and wasteful consumption.

WWF´s Forests for Life Programme has a long standing track record working with companies towards continual improvement within the forest and paper sectors and to increase supply chain transparency. WWF´s Check your Paper platform is one of WWF´s Forests for Life Programme´s efforts to motivate and reward continual improvement in the forest products sector. For more information, visit www.panda.org/forests

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2015 11 06 094349The WWF Environmental Paper Company Index (EPCI) 2015 shows a positive trend towards more transparency and sustainability by the world’s more progressive pulp and paper manufacturers. The 31 voluntary participants in this year´s Index together produce 15% of the world´s paper and board and 15% of the world´s pulp. While all participating manufacturers demonstrated outstanding transparency, more than 90% of product categories reported since 2013 showed improvement. 

“The pulp and paper industry has the potential to contribute to a greener economy. The EPCI 2015 signals progress in that direction, at least by the industry’s most transparent companies,” says Emmanuelle Neyroumande, Pulp and Paper Global Manager at WWF International.

The 31 companies participating in EPCI 2015, up from 25 in 2013, disclosed the ecological footprint of 85 million tonnes of pulp and paper. This represents 30% of the world´s tissue, 28% of the world´s graphic paper, 16% of the world´s newsprint, 7% of the world´s packaging and 15% of the world´s pulp.

The EPCI 2015 participants showing leadership in transparency are (in alphabetical order) Appleton Coated, ARAUCO, Arjowiggins Graphic, BillerudKorsnäs, Bio-PAPPEL, Canfor Pulp, Cascades, Catalyst, CMPC, Crown van Gelder, Domtar, DS Smith, Fedrigoni, Fibria, ITC, Kimberly Clark, Klabin,  Lecta, Leipa, Metsä Group, Mondi, Resolute Forest Products, Rolland Enterprises Inc., SCA, Södra Cell, Sofidel, Steinbeis, Stora Enso, Suzano, TNPL/India, UPM. Access the results of the 31 participants on www.panda.org/epci2015
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The EPCI is based on voluntary data disclosure by the companies. WWF evaluated environmental policies and targets as well as environmental performance in the production of newsprint, graphic paper, tissue, packaging and pulp. Scores were assigned on responsible sourcing, clean production, Environmental Management Systems and reporting. The Index also shows progress between 2013 and 2015 for companies that have participated in both of those years.

 “Of the 80 major manufacturers invited to the EPCI 2015, 31 participated, some already for the fourth time. We invite those who declined this year to get more familiar with the tool and to join the next EPCI 2017,” says Neyroumande.

Companies who participated in the EPCI 2013 were able to increase their overall scores on more than 90% of product categories. The product category in most need for improvement is pulp, which tends to show generally lower scores than other products.
 
WWF’s Living Forests Report projects paper production and consumption may double in the next three decades, and overall wood consumption may triple.The key challenge for forest-based industries is how to supply more wood products with less impact on nature. This challenge spans the whole supply chain, from where and how wood is grown and harvested to how wisely and efficiently it is processed, used and reused.  

 “The pulp and paper sector has unique potential to supply renewable materials that help do things as diverse as share knowledge, improve sanitation and keep food safe. However, this potential is diminished if poor logging practices degrade forests and deplete carbon stores, if plantations take land away from traditional communities, if dirty pulp mills pollute air and water or if paper fit for recycling is dumped or burned. The EPCI helps us assess if industry is making good on its promise of supplying essential products with reduced impact on nature,” says Rod Taylor, Director of WWF’s Global Forest Programme.

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2015 03 18 115559Eleven global hotspots will account for over 80 per cent of forest loss by 2030, according to research released today by WWF.

Up to 170 million hectares of forest could be lost between 2010 and 2030 in these “deforestation fronts” if current trends continue, according to findings in the latest WWF’s Living Forests Report.

The fronts  - the Amazon, the Atlantic Forest and Gran Chaco, Borneo, the Cerrado, Choco-Darien, the Congo Basin, East Africa, Eastern Australia, Greater Mekong, New Guinea and Sumatra - contain some of the richest wildlife in the world, including endangered species such as orangutans and tigers. All are home to indigenous communities. 

Rod Taylor, Director of WWF’s global forest programme said:

“Imagine a forest stretching across Germany, France, Spain and Portugal wiped out in just 20 years.”

“We must tackle that risk to save the communities and cultures that depend on forests, and ensure forests continue to store carbon, filter our water, supply wood and provide habitat for millions of species.”

WWF analysis shows that more than 230 million hectares of forest will disappear by 2050 if no action is taken.  Forest loss must be reduced to near zero by 2020 to avoid dangerous climate change and economic losses.

WWF-UK’s Chief Adviser on Forests, Will Ashley-Cantello said:

“Deforestation needs to stop if we are to reverse biodiversity loss and combat climate change – which, if unchecked, will affect our quality of life.

“Managing forests sustainably could underpin sustainable development, poverty alleviation and a stable climate around the world.  2015 should be a year of action locally, nationally and globally – and Britain can play a key role in driving change by shaping new UN Sustainable Development Goals and working for an ambitious global climate deal.”

Globally, the biggest cause of deforestation is expanding agriculture – including commercial livestock, palm oil and soy production, but also encroachment by small-scale farmers.  Unsustainable logging and fuelwood collection - or “death by a thousand cuts” - contributes to forest degradation, while mining, hydroelectricity and other infrastructure projects bring new roads that open forests to settlers and agriculture.

WWF-UK is campaigning to close EU loopholes that mean Britain still contributes to the illegal trade in timber products, and calling on British businesses to buy wood only from sustainable sources. 

Will Ashley-Cantello said:

“Here in the UK you can still buy furniture, books, cards and other products made from illegally or unsustainably sourced wood.  EU rules to prevent the exploitation of forests only cover half of traded products.  The next UK government should lobby hard to end this nonsense.”

The Living Forests Report will be published at the Tropical Landscapes Summit: A Global Investment Opportunity, an international gathering of political, business and civil society leaders in Jakarta, Indonesia.

Despite a recent slowdown, deforestation remains a major issue in Indonesia. Sumatra has lost more than half of its natural forests due to paper and palm oil plantations, and the remaining forest is severely fragmented. WWF projections show that another 5 million hectares of forest could be lost by 2030.

EU rules governing the trade in timber products are due for review in 2015.  WWF is campaigning to close loopy loopholes that contribute to the destruction of the world’s forests, and is working with colleagues in Europe to ensure that the regulation is implemented and enforced effectively across all 28 Member States. 

The Living Forests Report aims to catalyse debate on the future role and value of forests in a world where humanity is living within the Earth’s ecological limits and sharing its resources equitably.

The Living Forests Model, which WWF developedwith the International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis, forms the basis for the Living Forests Report. panda.org/livingforests

About WWF

WWF is one of the world's largest and most respected independent conservation organizations, with over 5 million supporters and a global network active in over 100 countries. WWF's mission is to stop the degradation of the Earth's natural environment and to build a future in which humans live in harmony with nature, by conserving the world's biological diversity, ensuring that the use of renewable natural resources is sustainable, and promoting the reduction of pollution and wasteful consumption.

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